preglomerular

preglomerular

/pre·glo·mer·u·lar/ (-glo-mer´u-lar) located or occurring proximal to a renal glomerulus.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
67) The lateral preglomerular nucleus also receives retinal signals and relays these signals to the dorsal telencephalic area (pallium of the cerebrum homologue (68)).
Moreover, renal auto-regulation occurs primarily in the preglomerular afferent arterioles, and it is modulated by various degrees of afferent and efferent arteriolar constriction.
Preglomerular arterioles and glomerular capillaries are affected.
Pathophysiology of drug-induced nephropathy Level of the nephron Action Drugs Preglomerular Afferent arteriolar Cyclosporine (afferent arteriole) constriction Glomerulus Decreased GFR NSAIDs (prostaglandins) Gold, NSAIDs Glomerulonephritis Penicillamine, cisplatin Proximal tubules Acute tubular necrosis Aminoglycosides, radiocontrast dyes Distal tubules Renal tubular ACE inhibitors, acidosis type 4 cyclosporine Tubules and ducts Crystalluria Acyclovir, sulphonamide Interstitium Interstitial nephritis Penicillin, allopurinol Renal papilla Papillary necrosis NSAIDs, analgesics Table 2.
The development of renal failure due to arterial hypertension is believed to result both from ischemia due to changes in preglomerular arteries and arterioles and from the effects of increased intraglomerular pressure (hyperperfusion), which inevitably leads to functional and subsequently structural glomerular changes and progressive loss of renal function.
Constriction of preglomerular vessels, although possibly contributing to the CM-induced drop in GFR, has small if any impact on medullary oxygenation: blood flow reduction in medullary vessels that emerge from efferent arterioles is usually accompanied by reduced solute reabsorption and, thus, reduced oxygen consumption.
In fact, poor glomerular perfusion and ischemia (obliterative preglomerular vascular changes) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the described phenomenon.