predispose


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to predispose: imposed

pre·dis·pose

(prē'dis-pōz'),
To render susceptible.

pre·dis·pose

(prē'dis-pōz')
To render susceptible.

pre·dis·pose

(prē'dis-pōz')
To render susceptible.
References in periodicals archive ?
A novel result of these studies was that genes identified as contributors to drinking behavior in the tested populations were not the same as genes found to predispose to alcohol dependence.
Variations in the gene may predispose cats to weight problems, she suggests.
Rather, women with circulatory defects that predispose their blood vessels to become blocked face an elevated risk for both fetal loss and heart disease, the researchers hypothesize.
A small hippocampus may predispose a person to form intense, long-lasting emotional responses to sights, smells, and other stimuli associated with traumatic events, the scientists theorize.
Men from India are more likely than those in other large ethnic groups to have a condition that predisposes them to type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, a U.
1) These authors hypothesize that the location of these primary tumors predisposes these patients to concentric scar formation.
Scientists at deCODE have reportedly isolated a gene which in one form predisposes to obesity and in another form predisposes to thinness.
How much of a leap is it to classify "persistent drug abusers" as suffering from a "mental abnormality" that predisposes them to commit "future acts of dangerousness"?
The disease is bilateral in 50% of cases, which suggests that some constitutional or systemic factor predisposes to its development.
When the presence of a concha bullosa predisposes a patient to occlusion of the ostiomeatal complex and subsequent sinus disease, surgery might be indicated.
One variant appeared significantly more often in obese people, suggesting that it predisposes them to gain weight or that the other variant somehow wards off obesity.