predigest

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predigest

(prē′dī-jĕst′, -dĭ-)
tr.v. predi·gested, predi·gesting, predi·gests
1. To subject (food) to partial digestion, usually through an enzymatic or chemical process, before ingestion.
2. To render in a simpler style or form.

pre′di·ges′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
If they do read it, they'll have a much more limited opportunity to develop those crucial grappling skills because the text has already been predigested for them.
The crop is a small sack in the digestive system that stores predigested food.
But my fear is that they will instead teach a series of predigested truths about keeping our country safe."
In this way, the intact (predigested) form of the protein is measured to determine the presence of large PTMs such as glycosylation or the presence of multiple protein isoforms that bind to a single antibody.
In other words, sprouts can be considered as predigested foods, and accordingly, they have a higher biological efficiency value than whole seeds, raw or cooked, which means that--compared to unsprouted seeds--a smaller amount of sprouts will provide more nutrients to the blood and cells.Sprouts have long been famous as "health food", but recent research shows that in addition to being a superb source of nutrients, they also have important curative ability.
Occasionally I see ballets that look like a predigested dessert.
Learning how to process information and draw conclusions is one of the most important outcomes of education, as opposed to only getting predigested content from texts and teachers.
"It has been estimated that 75 percent of information we use in all professional business environments has been predigested by governments"
When information is always "high level," predigested by staffers, a CEO may be perceiving an artificial world, a virtual reality as it were, of cleanly manicured lawns.
But it is generally not the way history is taught in college and high school, where students are force-marched through predigested facts and dates.
This is perhaps the most radical challenge of Gaghan's thriller, for his way of storytelling questions the very assumptions of Washington's one-sided, simplistic, and predigested view of the world.
EFFORT IS THE LAST THING that's supposed to be required of a reader of fiction these days, Ben Marcus observes, with considerable dismay: "Language is meant to flow predigested, like liquid down a feeding tube." So fiction of the sort he writes (he's the author of the short-story collection The Age of Wire and String and the novel Notable American Women), work that may appeal to the head before it appeals to the heart, and that tries to extend the boundaries of language and form, runs headlong into the wall of reigning critical orthodoxy: Fiction should be traditional, realistic, entertaining.