predict

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predict

(pri-dikt′) [L. praedicere, to foretell]
To declare what will happen; foretell. In clinical observations, it is to make an educated estimate about the natural history of a disease or its prognosis.
predictable (-dikt′ă-bĕl), adjectivepredictive (-dik′tiv)
References in periodicals archive ?
The predicted SARS cessation date was later than the date the last probable SARS case was reported for all three cities but very close to the lower limit of the 95% CI (Table).
Predicted nominees: Broadbent, Kingsley, Christensen, Voight, McKellen
If cash flows cannot be predicted reliably because they are not contractual or subject to actuarial prediction, there is no point in continuing because the result will be unreliable.
Each hospital's overall predicted cost/case is determined by multiplying its predicted cost/case by an adjustment factor.
Predicted earnings of unusually handicapped rehabilitation clients in Mississippi: Relationship to locus of control, counselor effectiveness, and selected personal variables.
The bank has predicted that Ontario's economy will also have a sluggish three-per-cent growth rate, fueled primarily by exports and household spending.
In their experiments, markets consisting of about a dozen Hewlett-Packard employees predicted future sales better than the company's usual methods of market analysis did.
28) drew attention to the significant uncertainty in this approach resulting from the fact that the concentrations of the drug in the mother's plasma and milk are time dependent and not always concurrent, which could lead to decreased accuracy in predicted infant exposure.
Ion energy distributions predicted by the model were in good agreement with measured distributions over the entire range of frequencies investigated.
Last month, Kyser and economists at the University of California, Los Angeles, Anderson School of Management predicted that Los Angeles would experience its first recession since the Gulf War.
Mold filling can be predicted using a first principles program.
However, since temperature rise is a balance between heat generation and heat dissipation, and heat dissipation is a heat transfer process which is not a function of viscoelasticity, temperature rise predicted solely from viscoelasticity may become artificial when the degree of heat dissipation is comparable to heat generation.