predict

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predict

(pri-dikt′) [L. praedicere, to foretell]
To declare what will happen; foretell. In clinical observations, it is to make an educated estimate about the natural history of a disease or its prognosis.
predictable (-dikt′ă-bĕl), adjectivepredictive (-dik′tiv)
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References in periodicals archive ?
(a) The predictability of novel context-flee naming units correlates with the ACCEPTABILITY of their meanings to listeners/readers.
With regard to reaction time, there was a significant interaction between predictability and sex, F(1, 30) = 6.16, p = .019, [[eta].sup.2.sub.p] = .17.
Despite the appreciation for short-term predictability, to make every dollar of Congress' recent increases count, there must be a long-term return to normal order for the Defense Department budget cycle.
As indicated above, the relationship between word-formation and word-interpretation (meaning predictability) is close but not straightforward.
The predictability of extremes can be measured in different ways.
In the next section we present the definition and estimators of the predictability of price formation processes.
The program also aims to reduce variability and increase predictability of clinical trials.
"We're delighted that these operators are benefitting from the economic predictability and dispatch reliability that our Smart Parts program provides," said Todd Young, Vice President, Customer Services, Bombardier Commercial Aircraft.
Within the last few decades, the prevailing view in finance is that there is predictability in financial time series.
Visiting Lord Mayor of the City London Alderman Alan Yarrow, who promotes London's financial and professional services, yesterday said the world's biggest businesses are coming to the Philippines but warned of bottlenecks in predictability of taxes, constitutional limitations, and skills gap that could derail sustained growth.
New to the book is the concept of prosumers--a conflation of producers and consumers--which is discussed in the context of the four hallmarks of McDonaldization: effiency, calculability, predictability and control.