predict


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predict

(pri-dikt′) [L. praedicere, to foretell]
To declare what will happen; foretell. In clinical observations, it is to make an educated estimate about the natural history of a disease or its prognosis.
predictable (-dikt′ă-bĕl), adjectivepredictive (-dik′tiv)
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it has turned out to be much more difficult to predict personality using the method the team used for predicting intelligence.
Sunderland is perhaps the biggest shock- finishing at the bottom of the Championship and seeing former Wales boss Chris Coleman sacked as managerafter they were relegated down to League One for the first time in 30 years - after they were predicted to come ninth!
The parameters selected are where (a) CNDMS predicted less than actual and NPR predicted less than actual, (b) CNDMS predicted less than actual and NPR predicted at least as much as actual, (c) CNDMS predicted at least as much as actual and NPR predicted less than actual, and (d) CNDMS predicted at least as much as actual and NPR predicted at least as much as actual.
The review of previous research across various fields identified a range of factors that could predict the academic performance in introductory courses.
(1) Match Result: Predict the answer to some easy questions like Toss Winner, Toss Decision, etc.
This study assesses the performance of the APACHE II predicted mortality when measured at the time of ICU readmission (the readmission APACHE II predicted mortality) and whether incorporating information on risk of death prior to the ICU readmission improves the discrimination of the readmission APACHE II predicted mortality.
Warning about the twin deficits and the Baby Boomers reaching retirement age, Peterson predicted a bleak economic future for this country.
Geographic and ecologic distributions of the Anopheles gambiae complex predicted using a genetic algorithm.
With an AAGR of 3.2%, they are predicted to climb to 1.2 billion lb in 2008.
Although the measurement of property decay at elevated temperatures and subsequent extrapolation using an Arrhenius fit has been used to predict property retention at ambient temperatures, it is generally not satisfactory (ref.
Still, answering a simple question may make the solutions to these issues more tangible and strategic: Can we predict how students might perform on standardized assessments?
Two questions formed the basis for this research: Do variables that predict retention for freshmen (transfer and first time) maintain their validity for predicting retention for nonfreshman transfer students?