precritical


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pre·crit·i·cal

(prē-krit'i-kăl),
Relating to the phase before a crisis.

pre·crit·i·cal

(prē-krit'i-kăl)
Relating to the phase before a crisis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From the vantage of today (sometime after the age of Modernity), it is clear that the New Testament's understanding of the Old Testament is precritical.
Not a totally inadequate explanatory paradigm, influence nonetheless remains a possibly outdated, uncritical, or even precritical one.
Apart from discussing Kant's critical thought in relation to some of his precritical texts, Nuzzo elaborates extensively on the relation between Kant's philosophy and that of rationalistic predecessors such as Leibniz, Wollf, and Baumgarten.
He traces the development of the discipline in chapters on Paul and Luke becoming published authors; the precritical age; the age of collecting, collating, and classifying; the original Greek; the age of optimism; the age of the papyri; the age of consensus; expanding the goals of textual criticism; and reassessing the discipline.
As studies show, it depended on both problems of precritical development, and structural disbalances which were accumulating in the country during long period of time, and non-availability of clean scheme of reforms.
Masuzawa asserted that though these characterizations "are mostly precritical, unreflected assumptions on the order of street-corner opinions .
Have other readers, both critical and precritical, heard the same echoes?
He considers any high Christology as the result of Hellenistic contamination of Hebrew thought and a precritical mythos that can no longer be seriously entertained in a post-Enlightenment context.
The results of this study appear to show that the outreach was a transformative developmental experience that moved students from a precritical consciousness stage to meta-knowledge construction to critical consciousness and cultural competence (see Figure 1).
According to Frei's schema, precritical readers of the Bible approached its text as reality, not as merely a reflection of it or contributing element to it, a hermeneutic orientation that assumed the subservience of a reader's epistemological frame to the world of the text.
For example, Watts, Griffith, and Abdul-Adil's (1999) five-stage (Acritical, Adaptive, Precritical, Critical, and Liberation) model describes the process of sociopolitical development among lower SES adolescents of color.