preconscious

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preconscious

 [pre-kon´shus]
the part of the mind that is not in immediate awareness but can be consciously recalled with effort, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs),
In psychoanalysis, one of the three divisions of the psyche according to Freud's topographic psychology, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled. Compare: foreconscious.

preconscious

/pre·con·scious/ (-kon´shus) the part of the mind not present in consciousness, but readily recalled into it.

preconscious

(prē-kŏn′shəs)
n.
The memories or feelings that are not part of one's immediate awareness but that can be recalled through conscious effort.

pre·con′scious adj.
pre·con′scious·ly adv.

preconscious

[-kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, prae, before, conscire, to be aware
1 adj, before the development of self-consciousness and self-awareness.
2 n, (in psychiatry) the mental function in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, or memories not in immediate awareness can be brought into the consciousness, usually through associations, without encountering any intrapsychic resistance or repression.
3 n, the mental phenomena capable of being recalled, although not present in the conscious mind.

preconscious

Psychiatry adjective Referring to thoughts that are not in immediate awareness but that can be recalled by conscious effort

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs)
psychoanalysis One of the three divisions of the psyche, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled.
Compare: foreconscious
References in periodicals archive ?
Processing of preconsciously acquired information measured by hemispheric asymmetry and selection accuracy.
Drawing upon recent empirical research into sensory processing, Matthen argues instead that vision operates at two levels: preconsciously, in guiding bodily movements; and consciously, in the "descriptive" activities of recognition and memory that we share with other animals, though they also underlie human cognition (pp.
Thus, the Georges-Abeyie Petit Apartheid Social Distance Severity Scale may identify individuals who consciously, preconsciously, or unconsciously manifest considerable social distance from those they process, or sit in judgment of.
Psychoanalysts use their preferred storylines preconsciously of semi-automatically as principles of selective attention and organization while listening.
It appears to be more of a gestalt process, with many of the decisions made preconsciously.
It appears that for the major part of daily life a person's self-concept is raised, edited, and implemented preconsciously, at the prelinguistic level of emotion and 'felt' dispositions" (1988, 150).
Now that we have descriptively captured opaque recklessness--the actor consciously chooses to engage in risky behavior and preconsciously recognizes why the behavior is risky, another question follows.
The pathway directly to the amygdala is shorter and quicker and allows emotional stimuli to be evaluated preconsciously and reacted to before one begins to think about how one feels, if one does at all.
Hemingway was also preconsciously aware of the slang meaning of conejo.
This capacity of the mind to preconsciously orient toward or away-from as befits the needs of the organism is referred to in the prior paper as the Hypothesis of Directional Intention, as it is proposed that the primary determinant of the direction of orientation is conscious and unconscious intention.
If the input analysis of text and speech operates preconsciously, then preconscious, attentional analysis might be automatic (in the sense of being involuntary) but it cannot be inflexible.