preconscious


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preconscious

 [pre-kon´shus]
the part of the mind that is not in immediate awareness but can be consciously recalled with effort, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs),
In psychoanalysis, one of the three divisions of the psyche according to Freud's topographic psychology, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled. Compare: foreconscious.

preconscious

/pre·con·scious/ (-kon´shus) the part of the mind not present in consciousness, but readily recalled into it.

preconscious

(prē-kŏn′shəs)
n.
The memories or feelings that are not part of one's immediate awareness but that can be recalled through conscious effort.

pre·con′scious adj.
pre·con′scious·ly adv.

preconscious

[-kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, prae, before, conscire, to be aware
1 adj, before the development of self-consciousness and self-awareness.
2 n, (in psychiatry) the mental function in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, or memories not in immediate awareness can be brought into the consciousness, usually through associations, without encountering any intrapsychic resistance or repression.
3 n, the mental phenomena capable of being recalled, although not present in the conscious mind.

preconscious

Psychiatry adjective Referring to thoughts that are not in immediate awareness but that can be recalled by conscious effort

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs)
psychoanalysis One of the three divisions of the psyche, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled.
Compare: foreconscious
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychologists studying subliminal perception, or "perception without awareness" (PWA), as is preferred today (Bornstein & Pittman, 1992), added the preconscious step B to the cognitive account.
This same introspective finding, that normally preconscious operations can be precipitated into consciousness as a result of deviant processing demands, likewise stands at the back of Coleridge's famous distinction of primary and secondary forms of imagination.
While commenting upon the "half-breed" passage, Gilman also pinpoints that Freud evokes the "mixed race" when he compares the unconscious with the preconscious (21), which is, if not inaccurate, at least incomplete.
They developed a taste for reading and learned how to do it largely at a preconscious level and without much effort.
According to Freud, "The regression of the train of thought to perception is absent in jokes," (42) yet within jokes one can still find "the other two stages of dream-formation, the sinking of a preconscious thought into the unconscious and its unconscious revision.
The second fundamental norm is to center attention on the inner depths of personality and its preconscious spiritual dynamism, in other words, to lay stress on inwardness and the internalization of the educational influence.
He misses not the innocence of his childhood, or a lost knowledge or preconscious state, but the loneliness that went hand in hand with the physical company or the reality these imaginary friends invoked.
However, since in the early 18th century women were so totally absent from public life that this gender discrimination remained in the dimension of preconscious routine automatisms of thinking.
While consciously framing and refraining the presenting problem--that is, finding the right problem--participants are, at a preconscious level, also beginning to learn how to unlearn.
In this process, the important works of integration and reintegration of beliefs, assessments and value investments make whole the preconscious basis of the research and its fit with other aspects of the researcher's life.