preconception

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preconception

(prē″kŏn-sep′shŏn)
1. Occurring before fertilization of an ovum, as in genetic counseling.
2. An idea or a belief held before analysis or investigation.
References in periodicals archive ?
They also discovered that the human sense of objectivity may sometimes be overpowered by preconception, which includes biases arising from external cues and prior knowledge.
Surprisingly, it might be harder to draw something very familiar, such as a face, than something very novel, about which one has no preconceptions," Chamberlain added.
oMy preconceptions were that it just wasnAEt my cup of tea, that it was for the older generation,o said Mike Hancock, a 26-year-old financial consultant, of Pontypridd, who along with his wife Kate attended his first ever opera on Monday night as part of a highly unscientific experiment conducted by the Echo and Welsh National Opera.
Dealing with issues of race and class difference, the play highlights the messy and contradictory emotions that fuel hatred, once again confounding expectations and assaulting our preconceptions at every turn.
Former Balanchine dancer Robert Weiss thinks negative preconceptions about male dancers stem from America's Puritan heritage.
So, presenters, your first step to success is to throw out those faulty preconceptions.
Songs like Louis XIV and Illegal Tender make features out of singer and guitarist Jason Hill's excitable vocals and his lyrical preconceptions with girls.
Bangers and beans have a special place in culinary history ( favourite meal of cowboys and campers alike, but forget all your preconceptions as an exciting new taste sensation hits the shelves.
An outgrowth of PBS's long-running television series POV, each yearly installment of the online series seeks to challenge visitors' preconceptions about everyday aspects of our existence.
Marilyn Gottschall, who teaches religious studies at a private liberal arts college in southern California, discusses the ways an assignment to recite the Qur'an in Arabic in a world religions class affects student stereotypes and negative preconceptions.
But what makes these works more interesting, and essential, than the user-friendly products of the culture industry is their insistent challenge to perceptions and preconceptions, not through statements, but through understatements.