precocity


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precocity

 [pre-kos´ĭ-te]
unusually early development of mental or physical traits. adj., adj preco´cious.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pre·coc·i·ty

(prē-kos'i-tē),
Unusually early or rapid development of mental or physical traits.
[see precocious]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pre·coc·i·ty

(prē-kos'i-tē)
Unusually early or rapid development of mental or physical traits.
See also: precocious
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Precocity represents the ability of the animal to store fat reserves, and is used to evaluate the capacity of the animal to reach a minimal degree of carcass finishing, with a low body weight.
Two-character analyzes were performed to estimate the (co)variance components and genetic parameters of the MW character, with the birth weight (BW), weight gains from birth to weaning (WG) and after weaning (YG), and final weight (MW; in kg) characteristics, conformation (WC), finishing precocity (WP), musculature (WM) scores at weaning and conformation (YC), finishing precocity (YP), musculature (YM) scores at yearling, and final index (INDF).
These late bloomers, and surely many others, demonstrate a single principle, crucial to an understanding of talent and expert skill development--that elite skill does not always take the form of precocity. Often when expert skill does take prodigious form, we conveniently overlook other influential factors such as practice, guidance and opportunity.
The precocity is significant in terms of amortizing expenditures and its contributions to fruit growing.
Since age-of-entry is relatively narrow in range, future research in sport may also benefit from examining precocity with respect to different accomplishments, such as age at first all-star selection.
Diagnosis--Hypothalamic Hamartoma causing central sexual precocity. (Fig 1, 2a, 2b)
He may also afford a convenient sign under which one may expatiate on and summarize the precocity frequently associated with the profession of the boy actors and the roles they played.
However, in exchange for sexual precocity and risk-taking, these rams often die younger than their more docile peers.
Brittain knows how to handle classy fillies but it is rare for one of his to show so much precocity at such an early stage.
According to one critic, "[s]triking, startling genius only can justify the exhibition of juvenile precocity." (43) Reportage in reference to fourteen-year-old Master Pole, performing at Melbourne's Theatre Royal, and Miss Kate O'Reilly, around the same age, simultaneously performing at Melbourne's Princess's Theatre, presents two cases in point.
Opal Mehta's apparently autobiographical story--celebrated in The New York Times, USA Today, and many other venues--was making Viswanathan a media sensation, a model of the kind of deranged precocity that Harvard increasingly demands of its students.