precision

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precision

 [pre-sizh´un]
1. the quality of being sharply or exactly defined.
2. in statistics, the extent to which a measurement procedure gives the same results each time it is repeated under identical conditions.

pre·ci·sion

(prē-si'zhŭn), Do not confuse this word with accuracy.
1. The quality of being sharply defined or stated; one measure of precision is the number of distinguishable alternatives to a measurement.
2. In statistics, the inverse of the variance of a measurement or estimate.
3. Reproducibility of a quantifiable result; an indication of the random error.

precision

Lab medicine A measure of test or assay reproducibility–ie, capability of producing the same results when performed on the same specimen under the same conditions; data with high precision has a low standard deviation and a low coefficient of variation. Cf Accuracy.

pre·ci·sion

(prē-sizh'ŭn)
1. The quality of being sharply defined or stated; one measure of precision is the number of distinguishable alternatives to a measurement.
2. statistics The inverse of the variance of a measurement or estimate.
3. Reproducibility of a quantifiable result; an indication of the random error.

precision

the quality of being sharply defined by virtue of exact detail, an important criteria of a diagnostic test. A precise test is free from random error. Precision is a requirement of accuracy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Precisionism began during the 1920s and continued until the end of the World War II.
Precisionism was an art movement that gave a sense of national identity to a wide audience of Americans.
In order for students to develop a clear understanding of Precisionism, they need to become familiar with as many examples as possible.
Knowing what Precisionism looks like may lead some students to emulate that style, although it may also encourage them to choose other artistic styles.
Valsecchi's photography is descended not only from Precisionism and Neue Sachlichkeit but also from the cool, cataloguing approach of Bernd and Hilla Becher.
Delicate filaments, mostly visual, some literary, linked disparate works in which high-keyed color, graphic precisionism, and over-the-top subject matter predominated.