precipitate

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precipitate

 [pre-sip´ĭ-tāt]
1. to cause settling in solid particles of a substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. to cause an event or occurrence.
4. (pre-sip´i-tat) occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prē-sip'i-tāt),
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

/pre·cip·i·tate/ (-sip´ĭ-tāt)
1. to cause settling in solid particles of substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity.

precipitate

[prəsip′itāt, -it]
Etymology: L, praecipitare, to cast down
1 v, to cause a substance to separate or settle out of solution.
2 n, a substance that has separated from or settled out of a solution.
3 adj, occurring hastily or unexpectedly.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

solid separated from solution/suspension

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate (prēsip´itāt),

n an insoluble solid substance that forms from chemical reactions between solutions.

precipitate

1. to cause settling of a soluble substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) The importance of precipitative events in fostering change was also noted in a recent study of the origins of the Federal Reserve book-entry system (Garbade 2004).
I have tried to persuade him, over the last 48 hours, that he should not do anything precipitative and he should certainly wait for the outcome of the Parliamentary Standards Commissioner.
The unions have meetings planned with all the interested parties in the coming week and have appealed to members not to take any precipitative action until the outcome of those discussions is known, '' a joint statement by the unions Amicus and TGWU said.
PPG's glass-faced acrylic windshields will be more durable, have improved aesthetics and optics, and be coated to drain precipitative static charges.
Slightly disappointing was the finale where the ending felt precipitative, almost like a train arriving early and hitting the buffers.