precipitate

(redirected from precipitative)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

precipitate

 [pre-sip´ĭ-tāt]
1. to cause settling in solid particles of a substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. to cause an event or occurrence.
4. (pre-sip´i-tat) occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prē-sip'i-tāt),
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The electrospun PEO/HIO/SA composite nanofibers with multi-functional properties such as anti-bacterial/bacferial decontamination properties and good mechanical property could be potentially used as a biomedical, absorptive, and precipitative material for public benefit such as clinical, food, and environmental applications as well as protective clothing, composites, and other areas.
This supports the proposition that change in an inefficient contracting provision may sometimes come slowly and only in the wake of a precipitative event that provides a compelling reason for change.
The catalyst idea is therefore patently false if taken to mean that alcohol is only a catalyst for aggression, and that the number of precipitative conflicts (situations in which catalysis would occur if alcohol were present) is approximately constant independently of the level of alcohol use in a society.
Where problems do arise, venture capitalists appear more likely to explore the problem in more detail rather than taking precipitative action.
And I further sustain that this spiritual homogeneity is absolutely different from the common masses of Hispanic peoples and that in [our homogeneity] the negroide factor intermixed in the Antillean psyche has served as a separator, or in chemical terms, as a precipitative agent.