precipitate

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precipitate

 [pre-sip´ĭ-tāt]
1. to cause settling in solid particles of a substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. to cause an event or occurrence.
4. (pre-sip´i-tat) occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prē-sip'i-tāt),
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

/pre·cip·i·tate/ (-sip´ĭ-tāt)
1. to cause settling in solid particles of substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity.

precipitate

[prəsip′itāt, -it]
Etymology: L, praecipitare, to cast down
1 v, to cause a substance to separate or settle out of solution.
2 n, a substance that has separated from or settled out of a solution.
3 adj, occurring hastily or unexpectedly.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

solid separated from solution/suspension

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate (prēsip´itāt),

n an insoluble solid substance that forms from chemical reactions between solutions.

precipitate

1. to cause settling of a soluble substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study on the position and etiology of infection in cirrhotic patients: A potential precipitating factor contributing to hepatic encephalopathy.
Mumtaz K, Ahmed US, Abid S, Precipitating factors and the outcome of hepatic encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis.
Devrajani BR, Shah SZ, Devrajani T, Precipitating factors of hepatic encephalopathy at a tertiary care hospital Jamshoro, Hyderabad.
Precipitating factors of hepatic encephalopathy: experience at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad.
Majority of the patients presented with hepatic encephalopathy due to common and very easily reversible precipitating factors, out of which constipation was the commonest followed by infections and gastrointestinal bleeding.
Aetiology of hepatic encephaloprhtyand importance of upper GI bleeding and infections as precipitating factors.
Factors precipitating hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhosis liver.
Precipitating factors of hepatic encephalopathy : Experience at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad.
This prospective cohort study aimed at identifying precipitating factors for falls among older people living in residential care facilities by analyzing the circumstances--related to the individual and to the environment--prevailing at the time of the fall.
Though a large proportion of the residents had multiple risk factors predisposing them to falls, the focus of this study was the precipitating factors--ie, the circumstances prevailing at the time of the fall.
After data collection, the research study group (1 physiotherapist [JJ] and 2 physicians [YG and KK]) evaluated the documentation on each fall and formed a consensus about the most probable precipitating factor for each fall.
Acute disease or symptoms of disease were regarded as a precipitating factor when symptoms or changes in the medical condition before that fall disappeared with treatment.