precipitate

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Related to precipitated: Precipitated Calcium Carbonate, precipitated sulfur

precipitate

 [pre-sip´ĭ-tāt]
1. to cause settling in solid particles of a substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. to cause an event or occurrence.
4. (pre-sip´i-tat) occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prē-sip'i-tāt),
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

/pre·cip·i·tate/ (-sip´ĭ-tāt)
1. to cause settling in solid particles of substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity.

precipitate

[prəsip′itāt, -it]
Etymology: L, praecipitare, to cast down
1 v, to cause a substance to separate or settle out of solution.
2 n, a substance that has separated from or settled out of a solution.
3 adj, occurring hastily or unexpectedly.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

solid separated from solution/suspension

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate (prēsip´itāt),

n an insoluble solid substance that forms from chemical reactions between solutions.

precipitate

1. to cause settling of a soluble substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.
References in classic literature ?
With a despairing scream the pirate leapt upon Long Tom and precipitated himself into the sea.
cried he: and my precious desk, containing my letters and papers, my small amount of cash, and all my valuables, was about to be precipitated from the three-storey window.
But we Folk of the Younger World lacked speech, and whenever we were so drawn together we precipitated babel, out of which arose a unanimity of rhythm that contained within itself the essentials of art yet to come.
The publication of "The Shame of the Sun" had started a controversy and precipitated the landslide in his favor.
With the crate thus suddenly arrested, Michael's body was precipitated forward.
The Employers' Association precipitated that strike.
First, disorder was precipitated by the secret agents and the Black Hundreds, then the troops were called out.
No, it was man alone who had produced these reddish vapors, these gigantic flames worthy of a volcano itself, these tremendous vibrations resembling the shock of an earthquake, these reverberations rivaling those of hurricanes and storms; and it was his hand which precipitated into an abyss, dug by himself, a whole Niagara of molten metal!
A lady in England lost her life by taking a similar mixture: the precipitated strychnine collected at the bottom, and in taking the last dose she swallowed nearly all of it
Expression on these subjects was precipitated from E.
I entered the room again as soon as they had left it, and at once precipitated events by a reference of the alarming kind to "Miss Halcombe's" state of health.
No matter that the unhappy honourable gentleman had been trying in vain, for twenty-five years, to precipitate William Barnacle into this--William Barnacle still put it to the House, and (at second-hand or so) to the country, whether he was to be precipitated into this.