preceptorship


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preceptorship

 [pre-sep´ter-ship] (pl. pre·cep·tor·ship)
a short-term relationship between a student as novice and an experienced staff person (such as a professional nurse) as the preceptor who provides individual attention to the student's learning needs and feedback regarding performance; students experience relative independence in making decisions, setting priorities, management of time, and patient care activities.

preceptorship

(prĭ-sĕp′tər-shĭp′)
n.
A period of practical training for a student or novice under the supervision of a preceptor.

preceptorship

A structured, supportive period of transition from learning to applying a complex skill (e.g., nursing) that requires a long and rigourous period of education. Preceptorship is similar to apprenticeship and serves as a bridge during the transition from student nurse to practitioner.

preceptorship

Graduate education A period of hands-on training under a physician or surgeon skilled in a technique–eg, placement of a stent in a coronary artery, or laparoscopic surgery. See Laparoscopic surgery, Paradoxical movement.
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The Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model of CTL for undergraduate nursing students was developed in late 1990s by staff at Flinders University, South Australia, as an alternative to the widely accepted 'gold standard' preceptorship model (Bott, Mohide, & Lawlor, 2011; Edgecombe et al., 1999).
Search terms applied included nursing education, preceptorship, nursing preceptorship, rural preceptorship, preceptorship challenges, preceptorship opportunities, rural and rurality.
* Set out best practice in health visitor preceptorship and consolidation of learning in the first two years of qualifying.
Students complete 16 hours of the preceptorship, eight hours each with a rapid response team (RRT) and an emergency room triage nurse.
The individual dialysis facility setting was cited as the top source for the following four training elements: formal preceptorship program (63%), informal on-the-job training (62%), competency skills checklist (60%), and hardcopy education materials (49%).
The success of preceptorship is impacted by the welcome and orientation; providing clinical skills and experience; and linking theory to practice (Myall et al 2008).
Debbie said the preceptorship programme was the a key part of the nurses' development.
While doing his internship, he also completed a preceptorship in plastic surgery.
He recommended starting out by taking a single-incision endoscopy course--the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery offers an excellent one, he noted--then doing a preceptorship with a surgeon who's accomplished in the procedure, followed by a proctorship, in which an experienced surgeon visits the trainee's practice and assists in several cases.
She completed a preceptorship in naturopathic cardiology in Scottsdale, Ariz.
Both medical and nursing professions adopted the principles of lifelong learning and continuous professional development (CPD) by offering preceptorship programmes for their practitioners.
This essentially eliminates contact between "drug reps" and physicians; and it also can be interpreted as precluding preceptorship in physicians' offices for industry professionals.