preceptor

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preceptor

 [pre-sep´ter]
a person who guides, tutors, and provides direction aimed at a specific performance.
employee preceptor in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting and supporting a new or transferred employee through a planned orientation to a specific clinical area.
student preceptor in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting and supporting learning experiences for a student.

preceptor

(prĭ-sĕp′tər, prē′sĕp′tər)
n.
1. A teacher; an instructor.
2. An expert or specialist, such as a physician, who gives practical experience and training to a student, especially of medicine or nursing.
3. The head of a preceptory.

pre′cep·to′ri·al (prē′sĕp-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
pre′cep·to′ri·al·ly adv.

preceptor

An instructor or specialist who teaches, counsels, and serves as a role model and supports the growth and development of an initiate in a particular discipline for a limited time, with the specific purpose of socialising the novice in a new role. Preceptors fill the same role as mentors, but for a more limited time frame.

pre·cep·tor

(prē'sep-tŏr)
An experienced nurse, physician, or other health care professional who guides and teaches those less experienced, including students; mentor.

preceptor

an instructor. Common usage of the term is that of a skilled practitioner or veterinarian in other field of work who gives one-to-one in-service training to undergraduate students in their practices or other places of work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Every student in each course was a first-semester freshman and had been registered in the course because of a listed preference for this preceptorial during summer advising.
This paper compares test scores and course evaluations from the microeconomics portion of the integrated course to the scores and evaluations of students from a pair of preceptorials taught the prior year by the same instructor.
In 1904 at Princeton University, the preceptorial system, which was similar to the tutorial method, was announced and then inaugurated in 1905.
Wilson first described his preceptorial system as a modification of the Oxford tutorial in that "teaching, to him, was a matter of advice and guidance by those more mature and experienced in fields of human learning for those less so, and was therefore a matter of intellectual companionship and joint participation in the pursuit of learning in its various aspects" (Craig, 1960, p.
The preceptorial system was similar to a group tutorial in that students completed assigned readings each week and then met with their preceptor in small groups once a week.
Early attempts at honors are known to have occurred in eight institutions: 1) in 1873 at Wesleyan College, honors were awarded at commencement, 2) in 1882 at the University of Michigan, the University system was established, 3) in 1888 at the University of Vermont, the award of honors was given on the basis of a thesis, 4) in 1905 at Princeton University, the preceptorial system was announced, 5) in 1909 and again in 1920 at Columbia University, attempts at honors programs were made, 6) in 1912 at the University of Missouri, Reading for Honors was implemented, 7) in 1921 at Smith College, an honors program was started, and 8) Harvard University initiated several different programs throughout the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century (Aydelotte, 1944).