pralidoxime chloride

pral·i·dox·ime chlor·ide

(pral'i-dok'sēm klōr'īd, prā-li-),
Used to restore the inactivated cholinesterase activity resulting from organophosphate poisoning; has some limited value as an antagonist of the carbamate type of cholinesterase inhibitors that are used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis.

pralidoxime chloride

[pral′ədok′sēm]
a cholinesterase reactivator.
indications It is prescribed as an antidote for organophosphate poisoning and drug overdosage in the treatment of myasthenia gravis.
contraindications Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use. It is contraindicated in poisoning by carbamate insecticides that react with pralidoxime.
adverse effects Among the most serious adverse effects are dizziness, tachycardia, hyperventilation, and muscle weakness. These reactions are most common when the drug is injected too rapidly.

pral·i·dox·ime chlor·ide

(pral'i-dok'sēm klōr'īd)
A chloride salt of the oxime pralidoxime; the salt is used as an antidote in cases of poisoning by organophosphorous anticholinesterases (including organophosphorous pesticides and nerve agents).

pralidoxime chloride

(prăl″ĭ-dŏks′ēm)
A cholinesterase reactivator used in treating poisoning due to certain pesticides or drugs with anticholinesterase activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of effects between concentrated dose & non-concentrated dose of Pralidoxime chloride on respiratory muscle paralysis in acute OP Pesticide Poisoning.
Pralidoxime chloride was the first reported oxime, developed in 1956, and is still the most widely used oxime particularly in developing countries despite the fact that it is the least-effective among therapeutically available oximes like obidoxime, trimedoxime and HI-6.
The drug, pralidoxime chloride, available as Protopam Chloride in the United States, was approved in 1964, as a treatment for poisoning caused by organophosphate pesticides and chemicals, such as nerve agents, in adults.
The drug, pralidoxime chloride, which is available as Protopam Chloride in the United States, was approved in 1964 as a treatment for poisoning caused by organophosphate pesticides and chemicals, such as nerve agents, in adults.
A second substance, called pralidoxime chloride, must be administered to release the nerve gas from the enzyme and destroy it.
Two drugs,atropine and pralidoxime chloride,have been used by the military as antidotes for nerve agent poisoning.