PRAISE

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PRAISE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation Trial–that evaluated the efficacy of amlodipine therapy in Pts with CHF. See Amlodipine, Heart failure.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A recent US study says that instead of praising your child after she gets her result, parents must praise them for their efforts.
It demands that the body move in energetic joy and that instruments too be employed to underline the fullness of the praising act.
The House earlier this session routinely passed a resolution praising Monroeville native Cynthia Tucker for winning the Pulitzer Prize for her commentaries in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
(111) Marriage orators were, accordingly, particularly concerned with praising the beauty of both bride and groom.
"I'm not surprised that the Naha City Mayor wrote a letter to the Secretary of the Army praising the Naha Military Port and our Commander, Lieutenant Colonel DiMarco," said Clark.
However, cultural sensitivity should be applied to praising employees.
Praising employees who do a good job is a quick and inexpensive way to motivate your staff.
* Be very specific about what you're praising. "You're doing a great job" is so vague, it can apply to anything.
(Or, very occasionally, the daughter's, a debate which Wieseltier follows with interest and sympathy.) Contemporary Jewish sensibility, not strong on the afterlife, sees the kaddish as therapeutic for the living, a way of finding solace in the community and praising even when praise seems impossible; premodern Judaism was flatly supernatural about the purpose and effect of the prayer.
All of this leads to the question, "Why do so many good supervisors fall short when it comes to praising employees?"
Understand that she was not praising ignorance, that this is not in praise of ignorance, although it is in praise of something like learning to be ignorant.
To my knowledge, most seem to be in the poetic form we call "apostrophe," usually praising God and his works.