pragmatism

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prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm),
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories, that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm)
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories; that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pragmatism

1. Action determined by the need to respond to immediate necessity or to achieve a particular practical result, rather than by established policy or dogma.
2. The philosophic principle that the truth and meaning of an idea is entirely relative to its practical outcome.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To conclude, Lance and Little's consistently pragmatistic view lacks the resources to answer our question--to explain what distinguishes "lawlike" generalizations from mere generalizations such that they explain the relevant phenomena, support counterfactuals in the right ways, and ground moral necessities.
Noting acidly that "evolutionary theory in itself is insufficient to generate ethical theory," William went on to insist, in typical pragmatistic fashion, that "subjectivity and personal bias are unavoidable factors" (Martin 67)--an observation that undermines the entire nexus of assumptions that authorize Winterbourne's, and science's, claims of an authoritative perspective from which the "truth" of others may be known.(4)
1-28.) As developed below, my pragmatistic view is that we are better off assessing the world as best we can rather than leaving it blank - that is, as subject to the de facto control of cultural stereotypes in the state inherited from our immediate predecessors.