pragmatist


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pragmatist

(prăg′mă-tĭst)
A person whose goals are achieved or attempted from a practical concept, action, or approach; a practical person.
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Maddalena understands identity as a dynamic, teleological "development of experience." To my mind just this move potentially lays the groundwork for a highly original pragmatist metaphysics (which, despite popular opinion, is not a contradiction in terms).
Similar to our findings, the authors of an article focusing on learning styles of medical students in Sialkot concluded that there was preponderance of males in reflector style and of females in pragmatist style; however this difference was not significant17.
Of course, it's quite impossible, in one short paper, to give anything like a full account either of the history of the pragmatist tradition in philosophy, or of the insights the ideas of that tradition might offer to legal theory--let alone to do both.
Other challenges, meanwhile, will require futurists and pragmatists to join forces.
The fact that this might not be Dewey's intent, or that philosophers' strictly adhering to Dewey's stated approaches might not yield this result, is largely beside the point; if one is to be a true pragmatist, one must focus on the likely practical political impact of a particular moral-epistemological approach in the real world, with real political actors.
Pragmatist also features exclusive intellectual property, based on the typical PR initiative process.
Because of these blinders, pragmatists can't understand nonpragmatists: "It is not unfair to say that the pragmatic liberal has taken the world of personality, the world of values, feelings, emotions, wishes, purposes, for granted.
Kitcher seems surprised to have wound up a pragmatist. 'Two decades ago', he writes, 'I would have seen the three canonical pragmatists--Peirce, James, and Dewey--as well-intentioned but benighted, laboring with crude tools to develop ideas that were far more rigorously and exactly shaped by...
of Adelaide, Australia) presents a pragmatist interpretation of the aesthetic theory of Immanuel Kant, drawing on pragmatist theories of meaning and language.
I doubt that any environmental pragmatist would make such a claim, and even in the passages that Carter cites from York one detects far more nuance than Carter is willing to credit him with.
Roberts frames his discussion around the metaphor of a river, with each tradition of experiential education (romantic, pragmatist, and critical) representing unique currents.
Salman, who is seen as a pragmatist with a strong grasp of the intricate balance of competing princely and clerical interests that dominate Saudi politics, was named defence minister last year.