pragmatism

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prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm),
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories, that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]

prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm)
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories; that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]

pragmatism

1. Action determined by the need to respond to immediate necessity or to achieve a particular practical result, rather than by established policy or dogma.
2. The philosophic principle that the truth and meaning of an idea is entirely relative to its practical outcome.
References in periodicals archive ?
(4) Richard Rorty, The Consequences of Pragmatism (Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota University Press, 1982), p.
Robert Brandom, Perspectives on Pragmatism: Classical, Recent, and Contemporary (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011), pp.
(29) Hans Joas, Pragmatism and Social Theory (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1993).
So James pay to religious problems and interpreted them by pragmatism. William James believes to third species for experiencing religious and paints it, means that beside intuitive conceptions and intrinsic conceptions, named religious perceptions.
Herbert Mid, like Dewey and James, was one pragmatist and pragmatist was American nineteenth century philosophy that believed that we must search sentence meaning in practical results that this sentence indicate them what have importance in this speech is that pragmatism emphasize on rational role.
After reviewing points of view of two schools, have offered common and segregation faces of two Idealism and pragmatism in education philosophy purposes and bases (Tables 1 and 2).
In sum, Rescher's book shows that pragmatism is not merely of historical interest but also has much to contribute to contemporary debates.
In the fifth chapter, David Macarthur and Huw Price offer a systematic study of the relation between pragmatism (their own special brand) and Simon Blackburn's quasi-realism.
Importantly, it demonstrates the unduly neglected role pragmatism may play in debates over moral objectivity, normative reasons, values, etc., in comparison to a more mainstream view in analytic metaethics, particularism.
In the seventh chapter, Terry Pinkard examines the Hegelian idealist background of pragmatism, with comments on Brandom's neopragmatism.