practicing

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practicing

[prak′tising]
the second subphase of the separation-individuation phase in Mahler's system of preoedipal development, when the child is able to move away from the mother and return to her for emotional nurturing. The child may feel elation in response to this investigation of the environment and through practicing locomotor skills.

Patient discussion about practicing

Q. does anyone practice bikram-yoga and know misuse of knee that can result from it? I just started this type of youga 2 weeks ago but do it 3-4 times a week and now I have a pain in the knee- like an inflamation from the pressure or something... Is anyone into bikram and know how can I prevent that from happening???

A. hi...This is Prashantmurti...I m a Yoga Teacher by profession...
In a straight way I will recommannd you to do a traditional Yoga...not like Vikram yoga or hot yoga...even Ramdev's Yoga has a possibility of high side effects...
If possible fing a yoga teacher or instution of Satyananda Yoga (bihar Yoga)in ur location, which is very practical,traditional, simple and effective...better not to do vikram yoga ..give some rest to ur knees and after that go thru Satyananda Yoga.
(prashantmurti@yahoo.com)
Happy New Year

More discussions about practicing
References in classic literature ?
Pity, the obliging hand, the warm heart, patience, industry, and humility--these are unquestionably the qualities we shall here find flooded with the light of approval and admiration; because they are the most USEFUL qualities--; they make life endurable, they are of assistance in the "struggle for existence" which is the motive force behind the people practising this morality.
Yes, indeed, I replied, and equally incompatible with the management of a house, an army, or an office of state; and, what is most important of all, irreconcilable with any kind of study or thought or self-reflection--there is a constant suspicion that headache and giddiness are to be ascribed to philosophy, and hence all practising or making trial of virtue in the higher sense is absolutely stopped; for a man is always fancying that he is being made ill, and is in constant anxiety about the state of his body.
But Lydgate meant to innovate in his treatment also, and he was wise enough to see that the best security for his practising honestly according to his belief was to get rid of systematic temptations to the contrary.