practice

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practice

 [prak´tis]
the exercise of a profession.
collaborative practice communication, sharing, and problem solving between the physician and nurse as peers; this pattern of practice also implies a shared responsibility and accountability for patient care.
differentiated practice the use of nursing staff in an acute care setting according to their expertise and qualifications.
evidence-based practice provision of health care that incorporates the most current and valid research results.
family practice the medical specialty of a family physician, concerned with the planning and provision of comprehensive primary health care, regardless of age or sex, on a continuing basis. Called also family medicine.
general practice old term for comprehensive medical care regardless of age of the patient or presence of a condition that may require the services of a specialist; this term has now largely been replaced by the term family practice.
nursing practice see nursing practice.

prac·tice

(prak'tis),
The exercise of the profession of medicine or one of the allied health professions.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]

practice

/prac·tice/ (prak´tis) the use of one's knowledge in a particular profession; the practice of medicine is the exercise of one's knowledge for recognition and treatment of disease.
family practice  the medical specialty concerned with the planning and provision of the comprehensive primary health care of all members of a family on a continuing basis.
general practice  old term for the provision of comprehensive medical care regardless of age of the patient or presence of a condition that may temporarily require the services of a specialist; the term has largely been replaced by the term family practice.
group practice  see under medicine.

practice

(prăk′tĭs)
v.
To engage in the profession of medicine or one of the allied health professions.
n.
1. The exercise of the profession of medicine.
2. The business of a practicing physician or group of physicians, including facilities and customary patients.

practice

Medspeak-US
The place where a physician practises medicine in a privately managed setting. (Termed “surgery” in the UK.)

Sports medicine (US)
verb To train at a particular activity; see Spring practice.
 
Vox populi
noun A habit; the manner of performing something.

verb (practise, BrE) To perform the art and science of medicine.

practice

Medtalk noun Surgery–British The place where a physician practices medicine in a privately managed setting. See Better practice, Family practice, General practice, Group practice, Independent practice, Integrated group practice, Malpractice, Office practice, Reduced-risk practice, Solo practice Sports medicine To train at a particular activity. See Spring practice Vox populi.
A habit, manner of performing something. See Good laboratory practice, Good manufacturing practice, Malpractice, Office practice, Reduced-risk practice, Solo practice, Spring practice verb To perform the art and science of medicine.

prac·tice

(prak'tis)
1. Direct professional involvement in health care services.
2. Rehearsal of a task or skill with the goal of achieving proficiency.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]

practice

in general, the repeated execution of an action in order to gain or improve a skill. blocked practice when executing a series of trials of one skill before moving on to practice another skill, typical of drills in which the same skill is repeated many times; distributed practice when there are periods of rest in between trials; massed practice when the order of executing different skills is randomized or mixed within a given session.

prac·tice

(prak'tis)
Exercise of the profession of dentistry, medicine, or one of the allied health professions.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]

practice,

v 1. to follow or work at, as a profession, trade, or art.
n 2. the business operated by a medical professional.
practice administration,
n the organization, operation, and supervision of the business and professional aspects of a dental practice.
practice building,
n the process of increasing the number of patients and the number of services without sacrificing quality, by means of observing the principles of constantly improving professional care and maintaining effective relations with patients.
practice goal,
n the planning of the objectives of a dental practice and the method of reaching those objectives. To be ascertained by the dental practitioner before or immediately on entering dental practice.
practice, group,
n a large partnership formed for the purpose of practicing dentistry; may or may not include the services of the recognized specialties in dentistry.
practice guidelines,
n a detailed description of a process of maintenance of health status or to slow the decline in health status in certain chronic clinical conditions. They are established to assist in the delivery of effective and efficient health care that preserves the resources of the provider, the patient, and the funding entity.
practice management, dental,
n the administrative organization of a dental office, including but not limited to the supervision and control of patient flow, staff assignment and evaluation, record keeping, and financial overseeing.
practice, private,
n the business and profession in which dental services are administered for a fee.

practice

the exercise of a profession.

advisory practice
practice limited to giving advice, usually to farmers on the subjects of breeding, feeding and housing in relation to maximum health maintenance and optimum production. Usually called a consultation practice.
association practice
a group of individual practices contract to use common facilities, possibly franchised by a central practice. Similar to a group practice, having the benefits of a large group of veterinarians but maintaining independence of the individual practitioner.
branch practice
a practice operated from another center, often with limited hours and facilities but clients can proceed to the main center of the practice at other times or for other purposes.
company practice
where the law permits is practice by a company with all of the commercial and financial benefits that the arrangement permits. Has the unattractive appearance of an attempt to evade financial responsibilty to clients.
consultant practice
practice as a specialist providing consultations and carrying out referrals for other veterinarians. Commonly used to refer to advisory practices (see above).
contract practice
contracts are made with individual clients for work to be done for a flat fee or a sliding scale based on time spent, or per head in the risk population or a percentage of the profit.
corporate practice
see company practice (above).
domiciliary practice
house calls. The average country practice is mostly domiciliary in that the veterinarian visits the patient in its own surroundings.
emergency practice
a practice set up specifically to attend to emergencies that arise at times when most other surgeries are not available, e.g. nights, weekends, public holidays.
fire engine practice
the standard practice based on providing attention for sick and injured animals in the surrounding area. For small animals the service is available at the veterinarian's premises but large animals are seen at the owner's domicile.
group practice
individual veterinarians use the same facilities and provide mutual support but each has his/her own clients and receives their fees after central costs are deducted.
illegal practice
includes practice by veterinarians who are not registered and practice by persons who are not veterinarians.
partnership practice
partners are co-owners of a practice, not necessarily by equal shares, and have consequential proportional entitlement to the profits.
principal-assistant practice
the principal owns the practice and hires assistants who are paid salaries and allowances. Most veterinarians work as assistants for one or two years after graduation.
private practice
practice by a self-employed veterinarian who is obliged by convention to be available to the public although it is accepted that such a veterinarian is entitled to limit the practice to a particular class of work, or to a geographical area or to a particular list of clients.
special interest practice
a practice in which the veterinarian limits the species or the kind of work that will be done, e.g. 'practice limited to cagebirds'.
specialist practice
see consultant practice (above).
subsidized practice
the veterinarian does not subsist on fee income only but is subsidized, usually by an organization interested in having a veterinary presence in an area that is sparsely populated. The sponsor is usually a government but may be a dairy manufacturing company or a wool-selling agency.

Patient discussion about practice

Q. does anyone practice bikram-yoga and know misuse of knee that can result from it? I just started this type of youga 2 weeks ago but do it 3-4 times a week and now I have a pain in the knee- like an inflamation from the pressure or something... Is anyone into bikram and know how can I prevent that from happening???

A. hi...This is Prashantmurti...I m a Yoga Teacher by profession...
In a straight way I will recommannd you to do a traditional Yoga...not like Vikram yoga or hot yoga...even Ramdev's Yoga has a possibility of high side effects...
If possible fing a yoga teacher or instution of Satyananda Yoga (bihar Yoga)in ur location, which is very practical,traditional, simple and effective...better not to do vikram yoga ..give some rest to ur knees and after that go thru Satyananda Yoga.
(prashantmurti@yahoo.com)
Happy New Year

More discussions about practice
References in periodicals archive ?
To allow CPAs a wider range of professional mobility and opportunity the Uniform Accountancy Act (UAA) introduced "substantial equivalency" to ensure that all CPAs are licensed and regulated equally regardless of where they practice or who employs them.
This book shares holistic body practices and shows how they can stimulate the creative process in the theater and in other performing arts.
Hypothetically, assume that a tax preparation practice that was sold engaged in improper practices and procedures--such as encouraging clients to take a particular tax position that was very aggressive and/or wasn't adequately supported by the law or claiming unsubstantiated tax deductions.
Nor should the impact of the present negative legal climate regarding malpractice be overlooked as an impetus for physicians to either leave practice or modify the scope of their practices.
There are several business systems within all practices that are imperative to success.
Pete Harper, Suntron's CFO, says, "We are taking the opportunity to drive ongoing process efficiencies and sustainable compliance practices, which is a key aspect of our management discipline and central to our commitment to customer and shareholder value.
The FOI Act 2000, which comes into full effect January 1, 2005, mandates a fundamental change in the culture and business practices of public bodies in England and Wales, ranging from central government to parish council levels.
To assess the availability and confidentiality of adolescent health services, researchers surveyed physicians and office staff of private primary care practices in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area.
They reflect on how beliefs and practices intersect and influence one another, pointing to a dynamic connection between the task of Christian theology and the practices of the Christian life.
Automating our practices for SAN management helps accelerate the benefit of new technology while minimizing the risk and complexity.
Poor Storage Management practices can act as a stone dropped into the enterprise's financial pool, creating a potentially disastrous ripple effect throughout the business processes.
Among them were concerns about how to address changing family structures, the increasing proportion of girls and women entering the workplace rather than confining themselves to homemaking, diminished extended-kinship systems, child labor, and the shifts in child rearing practices that were emerging in relation to migration and the consuming force of the industrial revolution.