ethics

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Related to Practical Ethics: Applied ethics

ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
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References in periodicals archive ?
(16) En otras palabras, "the classical utilitarian regards an action as right if it produces as much or more an increase in the happiness of all affected by it than any alternative action, and wrong if it does not" (SINGER, P.: Practical ethics..., pag.
(31.) See SINGER, PRACTICAL ETHICS, supra note 23, at 10-13.
In other words, there needs to be a basis of theory on which to create the practical ethics within your company.
Practical Ethics for Nurses and Nursing Students: A Short Reference Manual
Ashley University of Pittsburgh For significant contributions in computationally modeling case-based and analogical reasoning in law and practical ethics.
His books include Animal Liberation (1975); Practical Ethics (1979); How Are We to Live?
He is the author of many books, including Practical Ethics (1979), Rethinking Life and Death (1995), and Animal Liberation (1975), which has sold more than 450,000 copies.
"It is considered the major sin by journalists, and it should be," says Deni Elliott, a former Philadelphia Inquirer reporter and director of the practical ethics center at the University of Montana.
(1.) Elisabeth Leonie Simpson, "The Dead End: A Note on the Social Evolution of Practical Ethics," unpublished paper, 1972.
Given the erosion of the norm, and the weakening or lack of resolve by states to protect their citizens, practical ethics suggests a jus ad interventionem that "allows for collective intervention when a state's condition or behavior results in grave threats to other states' and peoples' peace and security, and in grave and massive violations of human rights" (p.
It would make sense for mining companies, through self-interest, to rally around one another to develop codes of conduct, noted Don MacNiven, director of the Centre for Practical Ethics at Toronto's York University, an independent facility that is reporting an increasing number of inquiries from business organizations about ethics training since it became established in 1994.
In 1989, a philosophy professor at a German university announced a new course based on a book called Practical Ethics by the Australian moral philosopher Peter Singer.

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