poultice

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poultice

 [pōl´tis]
a soft, moist mass about the consistency of cooked cereal, spread between layers of muslin, linen, gauze, or towels and applied hot to a given area in order to create moist local heat or counterirritation.

poul·tice

(pōl'tis),
A soft magma or mush prepared by wetting various powders or other absorbent substances with oily or watery fluids, sometimes medicated, and usually applied to the surface while hot; it exerts an emollient, relaxing, or stimulant, counterirritant effect on the skin and underlying tissues.
Synonym(s): cataplasm
[L. puls (pult-), a thick pap; G. poltos]

poultice

/poul·tice/ (pōl´tis) a soft, moist mass about the consistency of cooked cereal, spread between layers of muslin, linen, gauze, or towels and applied hot to a given area in order to create moist local heat or counterirritation.

poultice

(pōl′tĭs)
n.
A soft moist mass of bread, meal, clay, or other adhesive substance, usually heated, spread on cloth, and applied to warm, moisten, or stimulate an aching or inflamed part of the body. Also called cataplasm.
tr.v. poul·ticed, poul·ticing, poul·tices
To apply a poultice to.

poultice

[pōl′tis]
Etymology: L, puls, porridge
1 a soft moist pulp spread between layers of gauze or cloth and applied hot to a surface to provide heat or to counter irritation. A kind of poultice is a mustard plaster.
2 plant material (such as crushed fresh herbs) that has been wrapped in gauze or similar soft cloth, moistened, and applied topically.

poultice

Chinese medicine
A topical preparation composed of powdered herbs mixed in water, placed in cellophane and taped over the area being treated. Herbal poultices are used to relieve pain and repair musculoskeletal injuries, and thus are used for sports injuries.

Herbal medicine
A moist preparation of crushed fresh herbs applied topically and held in place with gauze.

poul·tice

(pōl'tis)
A soft magma or mush prepared by wetting various powders or other absorbent substances with oily or watery fluids, sometimes medicated, and usually applied hot to the surface; it exerts an emollient, relaxing, or stimulating counterirritant effect on the skin and underlying tissues.
[L. puls (pult-), a thick pap; G. poltos]

poultice

A warm pack, usually of kaolin wrapped in soft fabric, applied in the hope of reducing local inflammation and pain. Poultices are of relatively little value and are now seldom used.

poultice

soft, moist, heated mass applied to skin to achieve a therapeutic effect, e.g. kaolin

poultice (pōlˑ·tis),

n herbal matter that is wrapped in a soft cloth and moistened for topical application.

poul·tice

(pōl'tis)
Soft magma or mush prepared by wetting various powders or other absorbent substances with oily or watery fluids, sometimes medicated, and usually applied to surface while hot.
[L. puls (pult-), a thick pap; G. poltos]

poultice

a soft, moist, mass about the consistency of cooked cereal, spread between layers of muslin, linen, gauze or towels and applied hot to a given area in order to create moist local heat or counterirritation.