poultice


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Related to poultice: mustard poultice

poultice

 [pōl´tis]
a soft, moist mass about the consistency of cooked cereal, spread between layers of muslin, linen, gauze, or towels and applied hot to a given area in order to create moist local heat or counterirritation.

poul·tice

(pōl'tis),
A soft magma or mush prepared by wetting various powders or other absorbent substances with oily or watery fluids, sometimes medicated, and usually applied to the surface while hot; it exerts an emollient, relaxing, or stimulant, counterirritant effect on the skin and underlying tissues.
Synonym(s): cataplasm
[L. puls (pult-), a thick pap; G. poltos]

poultice

(pōl′tĭs)
n.
A soft moist mass of bread, meal, clay, or other adhesive substance, usually heated, spread on cloth, and applied to warm, moisten, or stimulate an aching or inflamed part of the body. Also called cataplasm.
tr.v. poul·ticed, poul·ticing, poul·tices
To apply a poultice to.

poultice

Chinese medicine
A topical preparation composed of powdered herbs mixed in water, placed in cellophane and taped over the area being treated. Herbal poultices are used to relieve pain and repair musculoskeletal injuries, and thus are used for sports injuries.

Herbal medicine
A moist preparation of crushed fresh herbs applied topically and held in place with gauze.

poul·tice

(pōl'tis)
A soft magma or mush prepared by wetting various powders or other absorbent substances with oily or watery fluids, sometimes medicated, and usually applied hot to the surface; it exerts an emollient, relaxing, or stimulating counterirritant effect on the skin and underlying tissues.
[L. puls (pult-), a thick pap; G. poltos]

poultice

A warm pack, usually of kaolin wrapped in soft fabric, applied in the hope of reducing local inflammation and pain. Poultices are of relatively little value and are now seldom used.

poul·tice

(pōl'tis)
Soft magma or mush prepared by wetting various powders or other absorbent substances with oily or watery fluids, sometimes medicated, and usually applied to surface while hot.
[L. puls (pult-), a thick pap; G. poltos]
References in periodicals archive ?
To make a comfrey poultice, dig the roots and wash them using a scrub brush and elbow grease.
Therapeutic herbal poultices infused with blend of individual chosen herbs are then used to massage the body to suits the guest's specific needs.
Method of making poultice. United States Patent 5599561.
Wild Ginger: Natives put the leaves on wounds as a poultice. The root is food and a powerful stimulant, so be careful.
Although the active ingredients commonly used in patches would still be considered Category I drugs (generally recognized as sale and effective), the use of the same ingredients in patch, plaster or poultice dosage forms would be Category III (more data needed).
Another herb that's very good for this condition is comfrey, making a poultice of comfrey leaves.
It then occurred to [Ellen] that the smoothness of herface might betray her; so she decided to make another poultice, and put it in awhite handkerchief to be worn under the chin, up the cheeks, and to tie over the head.
Salmon says Ricinus contains one of the most toxic naturally occurring substances known, yet the Tarahumara use the plant to make a poultice for bruises, boils, and headaches.
The bark of fringetree, also called old-man's beard (Chionanthus virginicus), has been variously used as a poultice for healing wounds and as a tonic after long diseases.
The "greenback poultice" as it has been described is no longer considered to be effective in the majority of cases (Mersky, 1986).
We cleaned a soiled fireplace hearth, usinga care system that includes a cleaner, sealer, polish, and a poultice mix; key steps are shown in the photographs.
[ClickPress, Tue Dec 11 2018] A luxurious sanctuary dedicated to renewal and rejuvenation, The Ritz-Carlton, Spa Bali has introduced an Herbal Healing Poultice to its extensive range of island-inspired therapeutic treatments.