potentiate


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potentiate

(pə-tĕn′shē-āt′)
tr.v. potenti·ated, potenti·ating, potenti·ates
To make (something, especially a drug or a metabolic or chemical reaction) effective or more effective.

po·ten′ti·a′tion n.

potentiate

(pō-tĕn′shē-āt)
To increase the potency or action.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, the data we presented here demonstrate that xylose potentiates the in vivo antibiotics effect of tetracycline and chloramphenicol in bacteria that actively expel these antibiotics.
This experimental design was used to test whether the gills synthesize [H.sub.2]S fast enough, and in a sufficient concentration, to potentiate 5HT-induced muscle contraction; these experiments were carried out in aerated ASW, again at 10[degrees]C.
"Copper is also thought to potentiate anti-inflammatory activity in the body.
Given together, aspirin and the low-molecular-weight heparin appear to potentiate each other.
Intestinal mucosal compromise may potentiate translocation of C.
PG490-88Na appeared in those preclinical studies to have direct anti-cancer effects, and to potentiate effects of commonly prescribed chemotherapy drugs such as 5-FU, Camptosar (irinotecan) and Taxol (paclitaxel).
In addition, since vitamin C has been proposed to modulate the bioactivity of D-fraction, (18) whether vitamin C might potentiate the apoptotic ability of D-fraction was examined.
Cognitively, the seriousness of the just completed surgery, risks, potential permanent deficits and fear of death may cause anxiety which will potentiate perception of pain experienced by the patient.
Each woman then received at random a 2.5-hour-long infusion of naloxone (which blocks the action of the brain's natural opiates), salt water, or butorphanol (a drug that can both potentiate and block opiates).