potable

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potable

 [po´tah-b'l]
fit to drink.

po·ta·ble

(pō'tă-bĕl),
Drinkable; fit to drink.
[L. potabilis, fr. poto, to drink]

potable

Clinical nutrition adjective Drinkable noun A drinkable fluid

po·ta·ble

(pō'tă-bĕl)
Drinkable; fit to drink.
[L. potabilis, fr. poto, to drink]

po·ta·ble

(pō'tă-bĕl)
Drinkable; fit to drink.
[L. potabilis, fr. poto, to drink]
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, since electrical conductivity only has an upper limit of potability (that is, if the conductivity is very low, the water is better), it is not going to be a problem that the module cannot detect very low values of electrical conductivity because that would indicate that it is of very good quality.
Access to clean drinking water is only the beginning however, as Gallup's data reveal that a narrow focus on potability may miss the effect that a broader discussion on water quality may have on people's health and wellbeing worldwide.
federal government additionally regulates water quality and potability
The quality of potable water is controlled according to AA-149/2-SCFI-2008 CONAGUA norm; this regulation states that potable water must be suitable for direct human consumption according to the local requirements of potability, independently from the uses it may have once delivered.
[18.] Olayemi AB Microbial potability of bottled and packaged drinking waters hawked in Ilorin metropolis.
A Medical help including essential medicines, water potability detection kit, water purification tablets, food materials, blankets, bed sheets, sweaters etc were rushed to Leh for providing succor to victims of natural calamity.
In 2006, students from Edinburgh, Scotland, built a strain of bacteria that villagers in Bangladesh could use to test the potability of water.
But are we to trade the potability of drinking water on bourses?
This collection of research articles on the contamination, toxicity and treatment of drinking water is designed for researchers and field engineers, with expert contributors examining the disease vectors and pathogens that may cause public health crises if safety guidelines for potability are not met.
If the groundwater is also to be used for drinking water, potability parameters should be included.
At micro-level, the site and potability were confounders; outdoor non potable water storage containers posed significant breeding risk, the potable water storage was significant but it contributed little to Ae.
Nancy Siraisi's "Historiae, Natural History, Roman Antiquity, and Some Roman Physicians" shows how sixteenth-century learned physicians in Rome "integrated medicine with natural historical, historical, and antiquarian learning" in a polemic on public health: "a battle of the books over the potability of Tiber water" (325), thus connecting ancient authors, narratives of their own cases, and public utility (a purpose shared with civil history).