postural


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postural

 [pos´chur-al]
pertaining to posture or position.
postural drainage a technique in which the patient assumes one or more positions that will facilitate the drainage of secretions from the bronchial airways. The procedure uses gravity to move secretions toward the trachea, where they can be coughed up more easily. Choice of position is based on radiologic studies and auscultatory evidence of pooled secretions. Variations of the most effective position are adapted to the patient's general physical condition, tolerance, and pulmonary status.

External manipulation of the thorax includes percussion (or “clapping,”) and vibration, often done in conjunction with postural drainage; they may be done either manually or with mechanical devices. Percussion involves rhythmic striking of the chest wall over the area being drained. The manual method is done with hands cupped, fingers flexed, and thumbs held tightly against index fingers. If done properly, a hollow sound is heard and there is no discomfort to the patient.

Vibration is done immediately after percussion and is directed to the same area. While the patient performs a prolonged exhalation through pursed lips, the therapist presses the flat of the hands or the mechanical device against the thorax in a downward movement toward the midline of the body. This is repeated four or five times. While neither percussion nor vibration is a difficult technique to master, anyone attempting to assist the patient in this manner should have instruction and practice beforehand. The purpose of both activities is to dislodge plugs of mucus, allowing air to penetrate behind them and thus aid in their removal.

The American Association for Respiratory Care has published clinical guidelines, which are available on their web site at http://www.aarc.org. These indicate that bronchospasm is sometimes a complication of external manipulation of the thorax.

pos·tur·al

(pos'tyūr-ăl, pos'cher-ăl),
Relating to or affected by posture.

pos·tur·al

(pos'chŭr-ăl)
Relating to or affected by posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article briefly describes the neurotransmitter systems supporting postural control, and summarizes the neural infrastructure and effects of PD on these systems, and details the remedies used to maintain postural control of patients with PD.
Postural disorders are often produced by poor habits.
The dynamic postural balance results for the groups are also shown in Table I.
As evidence of their criterion validity, postural control tests have demonstrated sensitivity to local, general, and sport-induced fatigue.
Postural sway and risk of falling were assessed using the tetra-ataxiometric posturography (Tetrax*-Sunlight medical Ltd., Ramat Gan, Israel).
Visual and postural balance systems are very different regarding their working mechanisms.
The better our postural habits, the more likely we are to utilize them when we drive.
A physical therapist (SB) evaluated the patients' postural sway using the Balance Master test device.
The purpose of this study was to assess the association of postural musculoskeletal discomfort with computer use, and factors that may contribute to the buildup of this discomfort.
Common risk factors for postural dysfunctions are lack of knowledge of correct posture, sedentary lifestyle, occupational demands, joint stiffness, decreased fitness, muscle weakness, poor core stability, and poor ergonomic workstations.
Based on this assumption, it was decided to perform a narrative review of the studies that describe the vestibular symptoms and postural balance in patients at the moment pre and post-surgical of cochlear implant.
For balance maintenance, the postural control system uses mainly information from three sensory systems (visual, vestibular, and somatosensory), which provide information about the relative positions of the body segments and the magnitude of the forces acting on this body, which are not constant [10-12].