postulate

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postulate

 [pos´tu-lat]
anything assumed or taken for granted.
postulate of causality the postulate that every phenomenon has a cause or causes; i.e., that events do not occur at random but in accordance with physical laws so that in principle causes can be found for each effect.
Koch's p's a statement of the kind of experimental evidence required to establish the causative relation of a given microorganism to a given disease. The conditions are: 1, the microorganism is present in every case of the disease; 2, it is to be cultivated in pure culture; 3, inoculation of such culture must produce the disease in susceptible animals; 4, it must be obtained from such animals, and again grown in a pure culture.

pos·tu·late

(pos'tyū-lāt),
A proposition that is taken as self evident or assumed without proof, as a basis for further analysis.
See also: hypothesis, theory.
[L. postulo, pp. -atus, to demand]

postulate

/pos·tu·late/ (pos´choo-lāt) anything assumed or taken for granted.

postulate

[pos′chəlāt]
Etymology: L, postulare, to demand
a hypothesis that is offered as true without proof or as a basis for argument or debate.

pos·tu·late

(pos'chū-lăt)
A proposition that is taken as self-evident or assumed without proof as a basis for further analysis.
See also: hypothesis, theory
[L. postulo, pp. -atus, to demand]

postulate

anything assumed or taken for granted.

Koch's p's
see koch's postulates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Third, the Pst pathogen is sensitive to the environment and the host background, gene postulation might yield diverse results under different environmental conditions.
The NA/Ad ratio increase triggered by the small dose of oral L-arginine registered in this study supports the postulation that neural but not adrenal sympathetic activity was enhanced by the drug.
use the language data from Southern Ndebele to support the postulation of the identificative copulative particle (2) of Zulu as ngi; and
One such idea is the postulation, based on a literal reading of Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle and seriously entertained by some researchers, that the universe would stop existing if we weren't here to look.
is planning to cut off or delay military sales to Taiwan as an expression of displeasure with Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui's postulation of "special state-to-state" ties between Taiwan and China.
The concept of cross-sectional efficiency is based on Granger's [Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 1986] postulation that asset prices, determined in efficient markets, cannot be cointegrated.
Spanish and Portuguese created "Latin America" (and perhaps rather fragmentarily) by suppressing, destroying, and assimilating (problematically) pre-Columbian indigenous cultures, but to see these as somehow constituting a prelapsarian Latin America is a rather mighty ideological postulation.
This entails, of course, the postulation of a chronology of the text of the Qur an, which appears to be confirmed by the perception of a congruence between events recounted in the Sira and the content of certain verses of the Qur an.
While (white) male identity has most recently been regarded as "a fragile and tentative thing with no secure anchorage in the contemporary world" (Brittan 12), the postulation of African-American male identity has maintained an equally vexed status, particularly since the annals of history have rendered the black male body as a commodified possession.
2) A caveat is usually added to the effect that this is an injunction to do with the postulation of entities, rather than its being a suggestion that theorists are guilty of filling the world with entities through their work.
Apparently building upon Joseph Harris's postulation of a subtext, Shippey wittily supplies the implicit steps in the logical sequence and resists the restoration of supposedly lost material.
Though the logocentric presence/absence signifier/signified postulation allow Derrida to say that "language bears within it the necessity of its own critique" (284), and from that "certitude" proceed with his deconstructive gesture, this postulation cannot explain the history of literal language, nor come close to locating its purported "rupture" as a historical event, even vaguely.