posttransfusion


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posttransfusion

(pōst′trăns-fyo͞o′zhən)
adj.
Occurring after or as a consequence of blood transfusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
ACBC was isolated by culture from platelet bag residuals and posttransfusion blood samples from the patient.
But many cases were reported to blood services several days or weeks posttransfusion, making any further rigorous investigation impossible.
The side effects of RBC transfusion include iron overload requiring iron chelation and more importantly posttransfusion reactions with each cycle of RBC transfusion, which could potentially be fatal.
Other rare reaction against transfusion observed in all patients are acute hemolytic reaction, allergic reaction, anaphylactic reaction, coagulation problems in massive transfusion, febrile nonhemolytic reaction, metabolic derangements, mistransfusion (transfusion of the incorrect product to the incorrect recipient), septic or bacterial contamination, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related acute lung injury, urticarial reaction, delayed hemolytic reaction, posttransfusion purpura, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, transfusion-related immunomodulation, and infectious complications [8].
In our case, the initial and posttransfusion platelet values were detected in the normal range (154000/[micro]l and 163000/[micro]l, resp.), and there was no sign of increasing bleeding time such as excessive bleeding from the umbilical cord after withdrawal of the needle.
Section C consisted of details related to posttransfusion records.
The impact of sensitization in a potential recipient results in longer waiting time for transplantation, posttransfusion complications, exposure to more adverse effects of immunosuppressor drugs, and finally graft rejection [38, 39].
Studies in Germany and England have confirmed the presence of RNA of viruses in donated blood samples (England 1/2848 voluntary blood donors, German 0.08% voluntary blood donors) and identified some undoubtable posttransfusion acute HEV in those who received blood products [29, 30].
Posttransfusion supportive therapy consisted of vitamin [K.sub.1] (5 mg/kg IM q12h), enrofloxacin (15 mg/kg IM q24h), vitamin B complex (0.06 mg/ kg IM 1 time), selenium and vitamin E (0.06 mg/kg IM 1 time), and supplemental fluids as needed (180 mL q24h; 2.5% dextrose with 0.45% NaCl).
From the 1940's it was agreed that red blood cells units can be stored as long as the average haemolysis is lower than 1% and the proportion of the red blood cells still alive 24 hours' posttransfusion is higher than 70%.

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