postoperative atelectasis

postoperative atelectasis

a form of atelectasis in which collapse of lung tissue is caused by the depressant effects of anesthetic drugs or the inability to breathe deeply or cough effectively because of pain. Deep breathing and coughing are encouraged at frequent postoperative intervals to prevent this condition.
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Postoperative atelectasis
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: Pre-operative incentive spirometry helps to reduce and prevent postoperative atelectasis in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.
Another Cochrane systematic review conducted by Freitas ER13 have however found no evidence of benefit from IS in reducing PPC's and in decreasing the negative effects on pulmonary function in patients undergoing CABG whereas KatsuraM14 et al while highlighting the limitations of the reviewed studies, have concluded in their very recent Cochrane Systematic review that preoperative respiratory therapies were associated with a reduction of postoperative atelectasis, pneumonia, and duration of hospital stay in adults undergoing cardiac and major abdominal surgery.
Smith M, Ellis E (2000) Is retained mucus a risk factor for the development of postoperative atelectasis and pneumonia?
Other noted advantages of epidural anesthesia are (1) Less bleeding (2) Lack of electrolyte imbalance (2) Early ambulation and recovery (3) No postoperative atelectasis of lung (4) Minimum blood pressure drop, without vasopressor drug in young patients.
A study was sought to evaluate the incidence of postoperative atelectasis in which O'Ryan looked at two groups of patients; one group treated with maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) and the other group treated without MMF finding a higher incidence of atelectasis in the former group.
This patient appears to be suffering from a classic case of postoperative atelectasis with possible complicating pneumonia.
However, non-linear regression indicated that longer duration of anaesthesia tended to be associated with postoperative atelectasis, and increased age to be significant in prediction of pleural effusion.
This is because the use of a right DLT is associated with blockage of the right upper lobe bronchus, and subsequent failure to ventilate this portion of the right lung throughout surgery, risking intraoperative hypoxia and postoperative atelectasis.
Even after uncomplicated cardiac surgery, a midline sternotomy causes significant reductions in lung volumes and capacities which may result in postoperative atelectasis and more frequently mild hypoxemia7.
Continuous nasal CPAP is recommended by some authors prophylactically, as a preventive measure against postoperative atelectasis because it is a well-tolerated and simple method for improving pulmonary functions, reducing pulmonary morbidity and length of hospitalization.