postmyocardial infarction syndrome

post·my·o·car·di·al in·farc·tion syn·drome (PMIS),

a complication developing several days to several weeks after myocardial infarction; its clinical features are fever, leukocytosis, chest pain, and evidence of pericarditis, sometimes with pleurisy and pneumonitis, with a strong tendency to recurrence; probably of immunopathogenetic origin.

postmyocardial infarction syndrome

[-mī·əkär′dē·əl]
Etymology: L, post + Gk, mys, muscle, kardia, heart; L, infarcire, to stuff
a condition that may occur days or weeks after an acute myocardial infarction. It is characterized by chest pain, fever, pericarditis with a friction rub, pleurisy, pleural effusion, joint pain, and elevated white blood cell count and sedimentation rate. It tends to recur and often provokes severe anxiety, depression, and fear that another heart attack is occurring. Treatment includes aspirin, reassurance, and a short course of corticosteroids. Nursing care includes close observation and emotional support, especially when debilitating anxiety and depression are present. Also called Dressler's syndrome.

postmyocardial infarction syndrome

Dressler syndrome, postinfarction syndrome, post-cardiac injury syndrome, postcardiotomy pericarditis Cardiology A post-MI pericarditis that develops from 2 days to 11 wks after an acute MI in up to 4% of Pts, open heart surgery, stab wounds to the heart, or blunt chest trauma Clinical Severe malaise, fever, fibrinous pericarditis often with a friction rub, chest pain, and pleuritis; more aggressive use of aspirin and less aggressive anticoagulation has resulted in a ↓ in frequency of PMIS. Cf Postpericardiotomy syndrome.

postmyocardial infarction syndrome

See DRESSLER'S SYNDROME.