postmature


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

post·ma·ture

(pōst'mă-tūr', mă-tyūr'),
Referring to a fetus that remains in the uterus longer than the normal gestational period; that is, longer than 42 weeks (288 days) in humans.

post·ma·ture

, postmature infant , postterm infant (pōst'mă-chŭr', in'fănt, pōst-tĕrm')
Referring to a fetus that remains in the uterus longer than the normal gestational period, i.e., longer than 42 weeks (288 days) in humans, which puts the child at risk because of inadequate placental function. The infant usually has wrinkled skin, and sometimes more serious abnormalities.

postmature

(pōst″mă-tūr′) [″ + maturus, ripe]
Pert. to an infant born after an estimated 42 weeks' gestation, who exhibits findings consistent with postmaturity syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Premature delivery (<37 weeks) was observed to be another significant risk factor of birth defects during 2003-2012 ( P < 0.001), and for postmature delivery (longer than 42 weeks), it was only significant during 2005-2006, 2008-2009, and 2011-2012 [Table 4].{Table 4}
Gestational age according to diagnoses Diagnosis Premature birth % Term birth % Mental retardation 18 79.2 Motor mental retardation 29.2 66.7 Cerebral palsy 51.4 47.9 Down syndrome 27.8 72.2 Autism-PDD 0 100 Muscle diseases 0 100 Learning difficulty 33.3 66.7 Other 25 75 Spina Bifida 42.9 57.1 Brachial plexus 8.3 83.3 Diagnosis Postmature birth % Mental retardation 2.1 Motor mental retardation 4.2 Cerebral palsy 0.7 Down syndrome 0 Autism-PDD 0 Muscle diseases 0 Learning difficulty 0 Other 0 Spina Bifida 0 Brachial plexus 8.3 PDD:Pervasive developmental disorder
Although maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy has been associated with adverse outcomes such as FAS, stillbirth, miscarriage, being small-for-gestational age, low birth weight, pre- and postmature birth, and abruptio placentae, the precise mechanisms are not known.
The composition of oocytes observed during this month was divided into three groups: premature, maturing, and postmature oocytes.
Infants with a gestational age below 37 weeks at birth were considered as preterm, infants with a gestation age of 37-42 weeks at birth were considered as term and infants with a gestational age above 42 weeks were considered postmature. Infants with a birth weight below 2500 g were considered as low birth weight, infants with a birth weight of 2500-400 g were considered as normal birth weight and infants with a birth weight above 4000 g were considered as macrosomic.