postictal


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

postictal

 [pōst-ik´tal]
following a seizure.

post·ic·tal

(pōst-ik'tăl),
Following a seizure, for example, epileptic.

postictal

/post·ic·tal/ (pōst-ik´tal) following a seizure.

postictal

[pōst′iktəl]
Etymology: L, post + Gk, ikteros, jaundice
1 after a seizure.
2 confused. postictus, n.

post·ic·tal

(pōst-ik'tăl)
Following a seizure (e.g., epileptic).

post·ic·tal

(pōst-ik'tăl)
Following a seizure, e.g., epileptic.

postictal

following a seizure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here we depict a circumstance which is noteworthy the degree which it shows exemplary components of postictal psychology, and in this way may aid to survey symptomatic standards, known hazard elements, and action upheld thru specialists.
The experience after a seizure (known as the postictal phase) can be diverse for people living with epilepsy, including confusion, delirium, and psychosis.
In an epileptic seizure, blurred consciousness and stupor mostly continue in the postictal period (28, 29).
6 Missing 13 Table 6: High risk characteristics observed in the perpetrators of violence High Risk Yes No Total History of Violence 32 15 47 History of Substance Abuse 22 25 47 Confusion related to Delirium/Dementia 21 26 47 Non Traumatic Cerebral Problem 16 31 47 Chronic Pain 15 32 47 Current Substance Abuse 14 33 47 History of Substance Intoxication 9 38 47 Head Injury 5 42 47 Current Substance Intoxication 3 44 47 Serious Mental Illness & Acute Psychosis 3 44 47 Serious Mental Illness & Antisocial Personality 3 44 47 Trait Postictal 2 45 47 Hypoglycaemia 1 46 47 Serious Mental Illness & Personality Disorder 1 46 47
Ictal and postictal features in EEG research have documented that some of the associated ictal features in CAE consist of 3Hz regular eyelid movement, and irregular and inconsistent eye opening, particularly during seizures in which the eyes were initially closed (Sadleir, Farrell, Smith, Connolly & Scheffer, 2006).
Stroke mimics were defined as conditions clinically imitating the symptoms of acute stroke (such as epileptic seizures with hemiparesis in the postictal period, otogenic vertigo, decreased level of consciousness or transient focal neurological deficits secondary to infection, uremia, hypoglycemia, or dehydration).
This was accompanied by drooling, up-rolling of the eyeballs, and postictal drowsiness for approximately 30 minutes.
On day 6 postpartum, she had recurrent episodes of generalized tonic seizure with postictal drowsiness.
However, the patient experienced right-sided chest pain, diaphoresis, and tachycardia of 160 beats per minute, followed by a convulsive episode with no postictal symptoms.
During EMS stabilization and transfer another generalized tonic-clonic convulsion occurred accompanied by postictal lethargy and confusion.
sup][10],[17] In McHugh classification, patients are divided into five classes according to the percentage of seizure reduction (Classes I-V), and the first three classes are further subdivided into two distinct sub-groups in relation to the improvement in ictal or postictal activity ([A] Improved ictal or postictal severity, and [B] No improvement in ictal or postictal severity): Class I means an 80–100% reduction, Class II means a 50–79% reduction, Class III means a <50% reduction in seizure frequency, Class IV means benefit only when magnet is used, and Class V means no improvement.