reconstruction

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reconstruction

 [re″kon-struk´shun]
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part, such as with a bypass or plastic surgery.
aortic reconstruction restoration of function to a damaged aorta, as by bypass or aortoplasty.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn),
The computerized synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in computed tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is two-dimensional Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

/re·con·struc·tion/ (-kon-struk´shun)
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part.

reconstruction

An eClinical trial term of art for archival trial records that should support the data as well as the processes used for obtaining and managing the data, such that the trustworthiness of results obtained can be evaluated. Reconstruction from records should confirm the validity of the information system and its conformance to applicable regulations during design and execution of the trial, as well as during the period of record retention.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn)
The computed synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is 2-D Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

to reassemble or re-form from constituent parts, such as the mathematical process by which an image is assembled from a series of projections in computed tomography.
References in periodicals archive ?
Manifesting the same ambivalent relationship to Hawthorne that marks the work of James and Howells, Phelps's novel stakes out her participation in a shared postbellum literary project.
Anna Dickinson, an abolitionist, suffragist, and one of the most popular pro-Union public speakers during the Civil War, demonstrated as much in her postbellum anti-Mormon speaking tour.
The final evidence on the breadth of postbellum southern patenting came from the percentage of southern counties reporting a patent over the period 1900 to 1912.
The HMB leader is clearly considered THE pivotal character in Baptist life in the postbellum period.
Sporting a chronological breath that takes in antebellum America, the postbellum period, and even finding time for contemporary political commentary, the book explores a fecund literary landscape that capably reveals the complexities of movement in the United States.
Its direct predecessor was James Russell Lowell's postbellum "Commemoration Ode.
First published in 1855 with a frontispiece that explicitly invites a comparison between Thomas Jones and Uncle Tom of Stowe's 1852 novel, this popular narrative saw numerous reprint editions and was expanded in 1885 to include a postbellum reminiscence of Jones's days as a slave.
In others, however, the deft touch of Buster Keaton is sorely missing from what, intentionally or not, plays like postbellum burlesque.
They begin their story not on an Alabama freight train, but on the slave ships from Africa, in the antebellum cotton fields and the postbellum chain gangs, in the factories and prisons, in the courthouses and the streets where the battle for rights is a battle for survival.
In Reading Rape: The Rhetoric of Sexual Violence in American Literature and Culture, 1790-1990, Sabine Sielke traces the rhetoric of rape in the United States through four distinct periods of literary history, stretching from antebellum seduction narratives to postbellum realism to modernist texts "and their post modern refigurations" (2002, 7).
However "the liberty that comes to the fore in the intended postbellum constitutional order and under the Secret Constitution requires the intervention of government," argues Fletcher.
Ignoring a slew of case law to the contrary, Fletcher nevertheless condemns the postbellum Supreme Court for being too Confederate.