reconstruction

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reconstruction

 [re″kon-struk´shun]
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part, such as with a bypass or plastic surgery.
aortic reconstruction restoration of function to a damaged aorta, as by bypass or aortoplasty.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn),
The computerized synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in computed tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is two-dimensional Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

An eClinical trial term of art for archival trial records that should support the data as well as the processes used for obtaining and managing the data, such that the trustworthiness of results obtained can be evaluated. Reconstruction from records should confirm the validity of the information system and its conformance to applicable regulations during design and execution of the trial, as well as during the period of record retention.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn)
The computed synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is 2-D Fourier transformation.
References in periodicals archive ?
As demonstrated by the widespread practice of lynching, black men's public visibility in the postbellum era increasingly became for them a personal liability.
Using many of the romantic images popularized by the plantation school, a number of postbellum travel narratives safely encase the region within a vocabulary that renders it both readmitted to the nation and safely other to it.
While commemorating the white soldier did bespeak a wish to remember those who gave their lives for their respective causes, the proliferation of versions of this particular commemorative trope, almost to the exclusion of any other, also helped define the face of the postbellum, reunited nation.
In the postbellum era, African-Americans owned their rime and labor and used their sense of clock time, inculcated under slavery, to negotiate with former masters over the terms, hours, and payments for their labor.
Surviving evidence suggests that some actors who played Othello in the South wore bronze makeup, but some wore blackface, even in the postbellum period.
This move unseated the Republicans and the reconstruction of postbellum Mississippi.
(1) In so doing, Higginson establishes a pivotal association between Pacific Northwest women's literary regionalism and postbellum New England women's literary regionalism.
The Mormon Menace: Violence and Anti-Mormonism in the Postbellum South
She examines the ways that church membership and reading were often overlapping activities for postbellum-period girls, the community functions of women's antebellum benevolence organizations, the backlash against women speaking or preaching in church, and the emergence of postbellum organizations that gave women a voice in moral and political issues like temperance and abolition, as well as girls' reading habits, the conflicts between educational and novel reading, and parents' worries and desires to use reading to ensure proper behavior.
Later, postbellum authors such as Cromwell, William Henry Crogman and Pauline Hopkins wrote histories that skillfully incorporated the quintessentially late nineteenth-century ideas of "progress" and "civilization."
"Euromance of Reunion: Sir Walter Scott, Italy, and Tourism in Postbellum America," Kaye Wierzbicki, Harvard University
The postbellum history of organized black ball in Louisiana dates as early as 1868, when the New Orleans "Aromatics" captured the national imagination with their quaint moniker.