postanginal sepsis

postanginal sepsis

pharyngitis preceding fever, rigors, cervical adenopathy, internal jugular thrombophlebitis, distant abscesses, and liver involvement, due to Fusobacterium necrophorum.
Synonym(s): Lemmiere syndrome

postanginal sepsis

A rare condition most common in adolescents and young adults, caused by a peripharyngeal abscess 2º to tonsillitis, pharyngitis, or dental procedures; the infection spreads by direct extension, or into the lymphatic or venous channels, causing thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, septic emboli and metastatic abscesses, often to lung Clinical Local, abscess-related Sx–oral and facial edema, hoarseness, dysphagia; lung involvement manifest by high fever, rigors, cough, pleuritic chest pain, hemoptysis, dyspnea Microbiology Fusobacterium necrophorum, peptostreptococci, bacteroides, Eikenella corrodens, S aureus etc Lab PMNs
≥ 30,000/mm3, ↑ LFTs, ↓ platelets, ↑ urinary sediment Management 
High-dose IV antibiotics, covering for anaerobes
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lemierre stated that postanginal sepsis could be easily diagnosed clinically, before microbiologic confirmation.
The most common manifestations of necrobacillosis include postanginal sepsis, bone and joint infections, and abdominal and genital tract infections.
When Lemierre first described the syndrome of postanginal sepsis, he noted that most cases developed in the setting of oropharyngeal infection.
Lemierre's syndrome: Two cases of postanginal sepsis.
Adult respiratory distress syndrome as a complication of postanginal sepsis.