response

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response

 [re-spons´]
any action or change of condition evoked by a stimulus.
acute phase response a group of physiologic processes occurring soon after the onset of infection, trauma, inflammatory processes, and some malignant conditions. The most prominent change is a dramatic increase of acute phase proteins in the serum, especially C-reactive protein. Also seen are fever, increased vascular permeability, and a variety of metabolic and pathologic changes.
anamnestic response the rapid reappearance of antibody in the blood following introduction of an antigen to which the subject had previously developed a primary immune response.
auditory brainstem response ABR; a special hearing test that tracks the nerve signals arising in the inner ear as they travel along the auditory nerve to the brain region responsible for hearing. A small speaker placed near the ear makes a clicking sound, and special electrodes record the nerve signal as it travels. The test can determine where along the nerve there is a lesion responsible for sensorineural hearing loss. It is often used for individuals with such loss in just one ear; this is often caused by a benign tumor along the auditory nerve, but if the ABR reading is normal in a given region, the chances of there being a tumor there are small. This test can also be used on infants since it requires no conscious response from the person being tested.
autoimmune response the immune response in which antibodies or immune lymphoid cells are produced against the body's own tissues. See also autoimmune disease.
conditioned response see conditioned response.
dysfunctional ventilatory weaning response a nursing diagnosis adopted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of a patient to adjust to lowered levels of mechanical ventilator support, which interrupts and prolongs the process of weaning. See also mechanical ventilatory weaning.
galvanic skin response the alteration in the electrical resistance of the skin associated with sympathetic nerve discharge.
immune response see immune response.
inflammatory response the various changes that tissue undergoes when it becomes inflamed; see inflammation.
post-trauma response former name for the nursing diagnosis post-trauma syndrome.
reticulocyte response increase in the formation of reticulocytes in response to a bone marrow stimulus.
triple response (of Lewis) a physiologic reaction of the skin to stroking with a blunt instrument: first a red line develops at the site of stroking, owing to the release of histamine or a histamine-like substance, then a flare develops around the red line, and lastly a wheal is formed as a result of local edema.
unconditioned response an unlearned response, i.e., one that occurs naturally, in contrast to a conditioned response.

re·sponse

(rē-spons'),
1. The reaction of a muscle, nerve, gland, or other excitable tissue to a stimulus.
2. Any act or behavior, or its constituents, that a living organism is capable of emitting. Reflexes are usually excluded because they are typically elicited by a specifiable (unconditioned or natural) stimulus rather than emitted under circumstances in which the stimulus was not specifiable.
[L. responsus, an answer]

response

(rĭ-spŏns′)
n.
A reaction, as that of an organism or any of its parts, to a specific stimulus.

response

The reaction to a stimulus. See Acute phase response, Adaptation response, Brainstem auditory evoked response, Clinical benefit response, Chronotropic response, Diving response, Evoked response, Fight or flight response, Frequency response, Galvanic skin response, Heat shock response, Hemodynamic response, Immune response, Intelligent voice response, Interactive voice response, Linear dose response, Minimal response, Placebo response, Pleotypic response, Sexual response, Triple response, Visual evoked response.

re·sponse

(rĕ-spons')
1. The reaction of a muscle, nerve, gland, or other excitable tissue to a stimulus.
2. Any act or behavior, or its constituents, that a living organism is capable of emitting. Reflexes are usually excluded because they are typically elicited by a specifiable (unconditioned or natural) stimulus rather than emitted under circumstances in which the stimulus was not specifiable.
[L. responsus, an answer]

response

see STIMULUS.

re·sponse

(rĕ-spons')
1. Reaction of a muscle, nerve, gland, or other excitable tissue to a stimulus.
2. Any act or behavior or its constituents that a living organism is capable of emitting.
[L. responsus, an answer]

Patient discussion about response

Q. How does an allergic response occur? I don’t understand the exact mechanism of allergies. Can someone explain this?

A. In the early stages of allergy, a type I hypersensitivity reaction against an allergen, encountered for the first time, causes a response in a type of immune cell called a TH2 lymphocyte, that interact with other lymphocytes called B cells, whose role is production of antibodies. The secreted IgE antibody circulates in the blood and binds to an IgE-specific receptor (a kind of Fc receptor called FceRI) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells and basophils, which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen. If later exposure to the same allergen occurs, the allergen can bind to the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils and cause a full reaction.

Q. I don’t know how to make him responsive at least when it comes to studies in school or at home? My child is diagnosed with ADHD. He was very inattentive in his class and we do get regular complaints from the school. At home he watches cartoons that he loves and refuses to have his dinner even. He cannot sit for more than ten minutes to complete his home work. Even very minor sound distracts him from doing his homework. He has trouble paying attention to the activities he does not like. I don’t know how to make him responsive at least when it comes to studies in school or at home.

A. it takes alot of time and patience and loving. without them none of itwill never work. both from teachers and parents and friends and family.

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