possessive

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possessive

(pə-zĕs′ĭv)
adj.
Having or manifesting a desire to control or dominate another, especially in order to limit that person's relationships with others: a possessive parent.

pos·ses′sive·ly adv.
pos·ses′sive·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the Belk, individual factors may be more important as Belk (1985) conceptualized materialism as a combination of envy, non-generosity and possessiveness. Envy involves the perception of being lower in status than others, and in the context of materialism wanting to attain more personal status through the acquisition of material possessions.
But it does exist within the religious texts and acknowledging that it is present could open the door to those religious individuals and communities who are critical of the current religious possessiveness, enabling them to join those who support reconciliation.
How might we counter our persistence toward entrapment, scandal, and possessiveness? James offers this prescription: Sing songs of praise, anoint the sick with oil, confess your sin, and, most important, pray for one another.
As the wedding neared, though, Wendy came to her mother and said she was alarmed by Theo's possessiveness. One day she bumped into an old friend, a man she had never dated.
Issues that are crucial to teamwork--such as leadership, communication, sharing, possessiveness, ego, cooperation, and competition--are elicited as they work.
"Even at that point, she was unsure of the relationship because he had shown signs of possessiveness."
Local entities are infamous for turf wars, records possessiveness, and, at times, a uniquely introspective and counterproductive provinciality.
Following are the construct measures examined: arousal-seeking tendency, attitude toward business ethics, motivation to conform, political and economic conservatism, coping with life, ethnocentrism, fashion consciousness, femininity, generosity, susceptibility to interpersonal influence, involvement with education, masculinity, materialism, patriotism, possessiveness, attitude toward product quality, attitude toward government regulation of business, risk aversion in product usage, risk taking in purchasing, self-concept, self-confidence, self-esteem, activeness in sports, enthusiasm for sports, time management, time pressure, venturesomeness, acceptance of authority, and motivation to work.
Reactions will vary according to generation and the degree of possessiveness one feels toward the songs.
"Many think jealousy and possessiveness are signs of love, when in fact they are examples of someone exercising power and control--and that's what abuse is about," says STAR's coordinator Divya Kumar.
Like Ajax, he leaves not because of Eva's possessiveness but because, like Hurston's Joe Starks, he is futilely seeking white male approbation through the acquisition of "shine" (36).
Most of these relationships with stationers had a shelf life of about three years, and Loewenstein's careful reconstruction of Jonson's intense and fractious history with his printers and the complex "story of proprietary negotiation" (211) surrounding the Second Folio of 1640 adds to our understanding of Jonson's singular possessiveness about his texts.