positron


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positron

 [poz´ĭ-tron]
the antiparticle of the electron. When a positron is emitted by a radionuclide it combines with an electron and both undergo annihilation, producing two 511-keV gamma rays traveling in opposite directions. This effect is used in positron emission tomography.

pos·i·tron (β+),

(poz'i-tron),
A subatomic particle of mass and charge equal to the electron but of opposite (that is, positive) charge.
Synonym(s): positive electron

positron

/pos·i·tron/ (poz´ĭ-tron) the antiparticle of an electron; a positively charged electron.

positron

[pos′itron]
a positively charged particle emitted from neutron-deficient radioactive nuclei; the antiparticle of an electron.

pos·i·tron

+) (poz'i-tron)
A subatomic particle of mass and charge equal to the electron but of opposite (i.e., positive) charge.

Positron

One of the small particles that make up an atom. A positron has the same mass and amount of charge as an electron, but the positron has a positive charge.

positron

the antiparticle of the electron. When a positron is emitted by a radionuclide it combines with an electron and both undergo annihilation, producing two 511 keV gamma rays traveling in opposite directions. This effect is used in positron emission tomography (PET).
References in periodicals archive ?
Positron emission tomography is the diagnostic medical procedure of producing a positron emission tomography scan to examine metabolic activity of the tissues particularly the brain tissue, using a radioactive isotope administered intravenously.
Conceiving of a new, remarkably light variety of water, a pair of chemists calculate that it is possible to replace the hydrogen protons with antimatter particles known as positrons.
Alternatively, "the underlying effect might not be the formation of a new particle but the action of a new force that causes a stronger interaction between the positron and the quark than anything in the standard model," says physicist David J.
To create antihydrogen, they needed to bring these two components together so that a positron ends up orbiting an antiproton nucleus.
That year, Perl was finding hints in the debris of collisions between high-energy electrons and positrons of a hitherto undiscovered lepton.
When electron meets positron, the two particles promptly annihilate each other, disappearing in a puff of radiation.