positivism


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positivism

A school of philosophy that rejects value judgements, metaphysics and theology and holds that the only path to reliable knowledge is that of scientific observation and experiment.
References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalThe danger with positivism is that it has the potential of leading to an unimaginable injustice because human rights abuses can be justified by relying on the law as it is.
The Dead End of Legal Positivism and the Retrieval of its Raison D'Etre
As another scholar described, that approach had been "the dominant school of legal theory in the United States in the late nineteenth and into the first decades of the twentieth century, both among legal scholars and the courts." (22) Tamanaha also notes the way that this approach offered an important supplement to natural law approaches and legal positivism (a theme taken up further below).
Positivism, on the other hand, is the theory that knowledge can be acquired only through direct observation and experimentation and not through metaphysics or theology4.
In Figure 2, minimum subjectivity tends to be associated with methodological approaches such as positivism, realism, instrumentalism and conventionalism.
In part under the influence of the dominant Catholicism, Neo-spiritualists displayed remarkable agreement on the criticism towards legal positivism accused of not having raised substantive moral questions and of complicity in recent history of nazism.
Fictions of Fact and Value: The Erasure of Logical Positivism in American Literature, 1945-1975.
Some of paradigms in in the domain of management science and organization are Positivism, Interpretivism, Critical theory, Post-modernism and Chaos theory.
My hypothesis benefits from insights of both MacCormick and Gardner concerning the nature of the fable, as well as from the idea that protecting legal positivism (put in Positivism and the Separation of Law and Morals) is the key to the reading of The Concept of Law in general, and of the fable in particular.
Tracing literary responses to logical positivisms precedence in mid-century US philosophical culture, LeMahieu demonstrates this positivism's determining but curiously disavowed role in the rhetoric of the era's university-centric fiction, from Flannery O'Connor's "Good Country People" (1955) to a swan song in Don DeLillo's End Zone (1972).
The topics are leaving the shtetl, from haskalah to positivism, young Dubnow as a Jewish positivist, coping with new realities, Romantic positivism, the historian become a nationalist, from the 19th to the 20th century, and reconsiderations.