position sense


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Related to position sense: proprioception, kinesthesia, kinesthetic sense, Body position

sense

 [sens]
1. a faculty by which the conditions or properties of things are perceived. Five major senses were traditionally considered: vision, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. In addition, equilibrium, hunger, thirst, malaise, pain, and other types of senses have been distinguished. The operation of all senses involves the reception of stimuli by sense organs, each of which is sensitive to a particular kind of stimulus. The eyes are sensitive to light; the ears, to sound; the olfactory organs, to odor; and the taste buds, to taste. Various sense organs of the skin and other tissues are sensitive to touch, pain, temperature, and other sensations. On receiving stimuli, the sense organ translates them into nerve impulses that are transmitted along the sensory nerves to the brain. In the cerebral cortex, the impulses are interpreted, or perceived, as sensations. The brain associates them with other information, acts upon them, and stores them as memory. See also nervous system and brain.
2. pertaining to the sense strand of a nucleic acid.
sense of equilibrium the sense of maintenance of or divergence from an upright position, controlled by receptors in the vestibule of the ear.
kinesthetic sense muscle sense.
light sense the faculty by which degrees of brilliancy are distinguished.
muscle sense (muscular sense) the faculty by which muscular movements are perceived.
pain sense nociception.
position sense (posture sense) a variety of muscular sense by which the position or attitude of the body or its parts is perceived.
pressure sense the faculty by which pressure upon the surface of the body is perceived.
sixth sense the general feeling of consciousness of the entire body; cenesthesia.
somatic s's senses other than the special senses; these include touch, kinesthesia, nociception, pressure sense, temperature sense, and muscle sense, among others.
space sense the faculty by which relative positions and relations of objects in space are perceived.
special s's the senses of vision, hearing, taste, and smell; equilibrium is sometimes considered a special sense, but touch usually is not. See also somatic senses.
stereognostic sense the sense by which form and solidity are perceived.
temperature sense the ability to recognize differences in temperature; called also thermesthesia.

pos·ture sense

the ability to recognize the position in which a limb is passively placed, with the eyes closed.
Synonym(s): position sense

position sense

a variety of muscular senses by which the position or attitude of the body or its parts is perceived. Also called posture sense.

pos·ture sense

(pos'chŭr sens)
The ability to recognize the position in which a limb is passively placed, with the eyes closed.
Synonym(s): position sense.

position sense

conscious proprioception
References in periodicals archive ?
1986) Effect of fatigue on joint position sense of the knee.
Other contrary findings, have been those of Boyle and Negus (1998), Glencross and Thornton (1981), Jerosch and Bischof (1996), Konradsen et al (1998) and Konradsen and Magnusson (2000), which support the view that ankle position sense is compromised in those with ankle sprains.
The former findings could imply either that neural pathways other than those residing in muscle, skin and ligamentous joint tissues might compensate for any deficit in ankle position sense attributable to impaired joint ligamentous or capsular, skin or muscular proprioceptive sources, for example central mechanisms.
1) In position sense studies, results have ranged from the finding of no proprioceptive deficit, to a greater deficit in the unaffected ankle, to a definite deficit in position sense of the affected ankle;
Unfortunately, ankle injury simulation studies that have examined the effects of anaesthesia on ankle joint position sense and muscle reflex response times to provide insight into this question, have largely provided non-conclusive results.
In addition, because the results of a single proprioceptive test may be misleading, especially in light of the limitations of these tests, we advocate a detailed clinical examination involving a combination of sensory tests, which examines the individual's ability to detect joint motion, vibration, and position sense.
Boyle J and Negus V (1998): Joint position sense in the recurrently sprained ankle joint.
Glencross D and Thornton E (1981): Position sense following joint injury.
Hertel JN, Guskiewicz KM, Kahler DM, and Perrin DH (1996): Effect of lateral ankle joint anesthesia on center of balance, postural sway, and joint position sense.
Holme E, Magnusson SP, Becher K, Bieler T, Aagaard P and Kjaer M (1999): The effect of supervised rehabilitation on strength, postural sway, position sense and re-injury after acute ankle ligament sprain.

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