portal vein


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portal

 [por´tal]
1. porta.
2. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.
portal vein a short, thick trunk formed by the union of the superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic veins behind the neck of the pancreas; it ascends to the right end of the porta hepatis, where it divides into successively smaller branches, following branches of the hepatic artery, until it forms a capillary system of sinusoids that permeates the entire substance of the liver.

he·pa·tic por·tal vein

[TA]
a wide short vein formed by the confluence of the superior mesenteric and splenic vein posterior to the neck of the pancreas, ascending anterior to the inferior vena cava, and dividing at the right end of the porta hepatis into right and left branches, which ramify within the liver.

portal vein

n.
A vein that conducts blood from the digestive organs, spleen, pancreas, and gallbladder to the liver.

por·tal vein

(pōr'tăl vān)
A wide, short vein formed by the superior mesenteric and splenic vein posterior to the neck of the pancreas, ascending in front of the inferior vena cava, and dividing at the right end of the porta hepatis into right and left branches, which ramify within the liver.
Synonym(s): vena portae hepatis [TA] , hepatic portal vein.

portal vein

The large vein that carries blood from the intestines, the STOMACH, the lower end of the OESOPHAGUS and the SPLEEN into the liver. After a meal the portal vein contains large quantities of digested nutrients.

portal vein

any vein that carries blood from one set of capillaries to another, such as renal-portal and hepatic-portal veins.

Portal vein

Formed by a fusion of small veins that end in a network of capillaries, the portal vein delivers blood to the liver.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2017, 2018) contributed to the knowledge on hepatic fissures: The seven segmental branches of the portal vein are terminal, that is, they do not have anastomosis; the same happens with the arterial and biliary branches.
Stents with the same diameter or 10% larger than that of the nonstenotic portal vein were used.
Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), due to its multiplanar capability and superb spatial resolution, is also an excellent technique to visualize these aberrations and confirm hypoplasia or absence of the portal vein. (8) Both modalities can detect hepatic nodular hyperplasia and characterize adenoma, hepatoblastoma, or hepatocellular carcinoma.
Right portal vein ligation combined with in situ splitting induces rapid left lateral liver lobe hypertrophy enabling 2-staged extended right hepatic resection in small-for-size settings.
An intrahepatic Portal Vein Aneurysm Presenting with Esophageal Variceal Bleeding in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Clinical Entity.
Portal vein flow velocity, portal vein flow, and portal vein diameter of all cases were measured by Doppler ultrasound in both groups.
Lee, "Management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein thrombosis," World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
Some parameters associated with the morphology of hepatic and portal venous systems as well as the positional relationship between them may also influence the accuracy and efficiency of puncture from hepatic vein to liver parenchyma and then into portal vein. However, the morphological structure of hepatic vascular system in patients with portal hypertension of cirrhosis is abnormal.
Lee, "Should anticoagulants be administered for portal vein thrombosis associated with acute pancreatitis?" World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
Mesenteric venous drainage was maintained through collateral veins that drained into the portal vein. Portal vein tumor involvement was not detected, and the portal vein was fully patent.
Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is defined as thrombosis within the portal vein trunk and intrahepatic portal branches.
According to this continuous progress, resections of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV), portal vein (PV), or coeliac axis are considered as a safe and reliable technique when performed at high-volume centers [7, 8].