portal

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portal

 [por´tal]
1. porta.
2. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.
portal vein a short, thick trunk formed by the union of the superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic veins behind the neck of the pancreas; it ascends to the right end of the porta hepatis, where it divides into successively smaller branches, following branches of the hepatic artery, until it forms a capillary system of sinusoids that permeates the entire substance of the liver.

por·tal

(pōr'tăl),
1. Relating to any porta or hilum, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
Synonym(s): port
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

/por·tal/ (port´'l)
1. porta.
2. pertaining to a porta, especially the porta hepatis.

portal

(pôr′tl)
n.
The portal vein.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the portal vein or the portal system.
2. Of or relating to a point of entrance to an organ, especially the transverse fissure of the liver, through which the blood vessels enter.

portal

[pôr′təl]
Etymology: L, porta, gateway
n, an entrance.

portal

Anatomy
adjective Referring to the portal vein.
 
Informatics
noun A website that is a doorway to other sites and services on the internet; portals may offer email and other service to entice people to use the site as their main point of entry to the Web.
 
Orthopaedics
noun A small (e.g., ±1-cm) incision over a joint to provide access for arthroscopy.
 
Radiation oncology
See Port.

portal

noun Orthopedics A small–eg, ±1 cm incision over a joint to provide access for arthroscopy Radiation oncology See Port adjective AnatomyReferring to the portal vein.

por·tal

(pōr'tăl)
1. Relating to any porta or hilus, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
3. Synonym(s): field size. Synonym(s): port.
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

Pertaining to an entrance or gateway, especially to the porta hepatis, the fissure under the liver at which the PORTAL VEIN, the hepatic artery and the hepatic bile ducts pass through.

Portal

An entrance or a means of entrance.
Mentioned in: General Surgery

portal

entry point of any pathogenic microorganism

por·tal

(pōr'tăl)
1. Relating to any porta or hilus, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
3. Synonym(s): field size.
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

1. an avenue of entrance; porta.
2. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.

portal-azygos anastomosis
a form of portacaval shunt with the portal vein bypassing the liver and emptying directly into the azygos vein.
portal biliary bacterial circulation
a continuous normal circulation of bacteria brought to the liver in the portal vein from the gut and excreted back into the gut via the biliary system.
portal canal
tissue space situated between three or more hepatic lobules; carries the blood and lymphatic vessels and connective tissue.
portal-caval
see portacaval.
portal circulation
circulation of blood from the capillaries of one organ to those of another; applied especially to the passage of blood from the gastrointestinal tract and spleen through the portal vein to the liver. See also circulatory system.
portal of entry
the pathway by which bacteria or other pathogenic agents gain entry to the body.
portal fibrosis
see biliary fibrosis.
portal hypertension
see portal obstruction.
portal obstruction
obstruction of portal venous blood flow through external pressure on the portal vein, by abscess or tumor or by hepatic fibrosis constricting the hepatic vascular bed, causes interference with digestion and absorption and eventually venous return so that ascites and diarrhea develop.
portal system
an arrangement by which blood collected from one set of capillaries passes through a large vessel or vessels and another set of capillaries before returning to the systemic circulation, as in the pituitary gland and liver.
Includes the hepatic portal system consisting of portal vein and its tributaries from the stomach, intestine, pancreas and spleen, the vessels into which the portal vein divides in the liver and the hepatic veins that enter into the caudal vena cava.
portal systemic shunt
see portacaval shunt.
portal triad
anatomically close association of interlobular bile duct, branches of hepatic artery and portal vein.
portal vascular anomalies
see portacaval anastomosis.
portal vein
a short, thick trunk formed by the union of the caudal mesenteric and splenic veins; at the porta hepatis, it divides into successively smaller branches, following branches of the hepatic artery, until it forms a capillary system of sinusoids that permeates the entire substance of the liver.
portal vein obstruction
acute, complete obstruction causes a syndrome similar to that of intestinal obstruction without signs suggesting liver involvement; partial occlusion causes shrinkage and eventual atrophy of the relevant section of the liver.
portal vein rupture
rare complication of epiploic foraminal herniation; sudden death from internal hemorrhage results.
portal venule absence
a congenital defect resulting in the development of multiple shunts within the liver, hepatoportal fibrosis and ascites, general immaturity and hepatic encephalopathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, we found the following histologic changes in liver tissue from 79 East Greenland polar bears: nuclear displacement, mononuclear cell infiltrations, mild bile duct proliferation accompanied by portal fibrosis, and fat accumulation.
6] Nonstandard abbreviations: HCV, hepatitis C virus; FT, FibroTest; AT, ActiTest; AUROC, area under the ROC curve; F0, no fibrosis; F1, portal fibrosis without septa; F2, few septa; F3, numerous septa without cirrhosis; F4, cirrhosis; HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; CI, confidence interval.
Among these, the most predictive features of biliary atresia by logistic regression analysis (also taking into account interobserver variability) were ductular reaction, portal fibrosis, and absence of sinusoidal fibrosis.
The following distribution of METAVIR fibrosis stages was observed on liver biopsy: no fibrosis in 25 of 125 patients (FO = 20%); portal fibrosis in 52 of 125 (F1 = 42%); few septa in 26 of 125 (F2 = 21%); numerous septa in 13 of 125 (F3 = 10%); and cirrhosis in 9 of 125 (F4 = 7%).
Histologic examination revealed mild distortion of the lobular architecture, complex vascular abnormalities, and mild portal fibrosis (Figure 2).
Of the cases with diagnostic disagreements, 5 were of major clinical significance, including a biopsy of hemochromatosis, which was originally called portal inflammation; a case of submassive necrosis, originally called suggestive of primary sclerosing cholangitis; a case of autoimmune hepatitis, originally called nonspecific chronic inflammation; a hepatocellular carcinoma, originally called adenocarcinoma; and a case of chronic hepatitis with portal fibrosis and steatosis, originally called mild steatosis.
Furthermore, one should look for destructive cholangitis associated with primary biliary cirrhosis or interface hepatitis (piecemeal necrosis) around lymphoid nodules with varying degrees of portal fibrosis in cases of chronic hepatitis B or C infection.