portal

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portal

 [por´tal]
1. porta.
2. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.
portal vein a short, thick trunk formed by the union of the superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic veins behind the neck of the pancreas; it ascends to the right end of the porta hepatis, where it divides into successively smaller branches, following branches of the hepatic artery, until it forms a capillary system of sinusoids that permeates the entire substance of the liver.

por·tal

(pōr'tăl),
1. Relating to any porta or hilum, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
Synonym(s): port
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

(pôr′tl)
n.
The portal vein.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the portal vein or the portal system.
2. Of or relating to a point of entrance to an organ, especially the transverse fissure of the liver, through which the blood vessels enter.

portal

Anatomy
adjective Referring to the portal vein.
 
Informatics
noun A website that is a doorway to other sites and services on the internet; portals may offer email and other service to entice people to use the site as their main point of entry to the Web.
 
Orthopaedics
noun A small (e.g., ±1-cm) incision over a joint to provide access for arthroscopy.
 
Radiation oncology
See Port.

portal

noun Orthopedics A small–eg, ±1 cm incision over a joint to provide access for arthroscopy Radiation oncology See Port adjective AnatomyReferring to the portal vein.

por·tal

(pōr'tăl)
1. Relating to any porta or hilus, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
3. Synonym(s): field size. Synonym(s): port.
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

Pertaining to an entrance or gateway, especially to the porta hepatis, the fissure under the liver at which the PORTAL VEIN, the hepatic artery and the hepatic bile ducts pass through.

Portal

An entrance or a means of entrance.
Mentioned in: General Surgery

por·tal

(pōr'tăl)
1. Relating to any porta or hilus, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
3. Synonym(s): field size.
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]
References in periodicals archive ?
Bile duct proliferation and portal fibrosis. Bile duct proliferation has been associated with toxic injury, parasitism, or periductular fibrosis in terrestrial animals (Kelly 1993; MacLachlan and Cullen 1995) and is therefore a nonspecific reaction to chronic extrinsic and/or environmental factors.
Masson trichrome stain highlighting the centrilobular dropout (light blue, upper right), compared with mild portal fibrosis in the same biopsy (darker blue, bottom left) (original magnification X200).
Non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis: a clinical profile of 366 patients (abstract).
The occurrence of higher grades of portal fibrosis was significantly higher in the BA group (60% with focal porto-portal bridging) and the neglected BA group (50% with marked bridging and 10% with cirrhosis) than in the non-BA group (20% with focal porto-portal bridging and 6.7% with marked bridging) (P < 0.0001).
The portal fibrosis is typically accompanied by ductular reaction and mild inflammation, as described above, as well as by some degree of portal and periductal edema, which imparts a distinctive "obstructive" appearance to the expanded portal tracts (Figure 2, A and B).
Fibrosis was staged on a scale of 0-4: F0, no fibrosis; F1, portal fibrosis without septa; F2, few septa; F3, numerous septa without cirrhosis; F4, cirrhosis.
(49,50) In the setting of concurrent, chronic hepatitis C and fatty liver disease (not including minor, virus-induced steatosis), scoring of the grade and stage may be inappropriate because distinguishing the contributions of each entity can be difficult or impossible; both diseases may show some degree of portal fibrosis, mild portal mononuclear infiltrates, and apoptotic bodies.
Fibrosis was scored on a 5-point scale: F0, no fibrosis; F1, portal fibrosis alone; F2, portal fibrosis with rare septae; F3, portal fibrosis with many septae; F4, cirrhosis.
Histologic examination revealed mild distortion of the lobular architecture, complex vascular abnormalities, and mild portal fibrosis (Figure 2).
Every biopsy specimen was staged on a scale of FO to F4: F0, no fibrosis; F1, portal fibrosis without septa; F2, few septa; F3, many septa without cirrhosis; and F4, cirrhosis.
Of the cases with diagnostic disagreements, 5 were of major clinical significance, including a biopsy of hemochromatosis, which was originally called portal inflammation; a case of submassive necrosis, originally called suggestive of primary sclerosing cholangitis; a case of autoimmune hepatitis, originally called nonspecific chronic inflammation; a hepatocellular carcinoma, originally called adenocarcinoma; and a case of chronic hepatitis with portal fibrosis and steatosis, originally called mild steatosis.
Furthermore, one should look for destructive cholangitis associated with primary biliary cirrhosis or interface hepatitis (piecemeal necrosis) around lymphoid nodules with varying degrees of portal fibrosis in cases of chronic hepatitis B or C infection.