porcelain

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por·ce·lain

(pōr'sĕ-lin),
A powder composed of a clay, silica, and a flux that, when mixed with water, forms a paste that is molded to form artificial teeth, inlays, jacket crowns, and dentures. When heated, the materials fuse to form a ceramic.

por·ce·lain

(pōr'sĕ-lin)
A powder composed of clay, silica, and a flux that, when mixed with water, forms a paste that is molded to form artificial teeth, inlays, jacket crowns, and dentures. When heated, the materials fuse to form a ceramic.

por·ce·lain

(pōr'sĕ-lin)
Powder composed of clay, silica, and a flux that, when mixed with water, forms a paste that is molded to form artificial teeth, inlays, jacket crowns, and dentures. When heated, materials fuse to form a ceramic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The exhibition will display various types of local porcelain, including vintage and armorial porcelain ware that was mainly for export, as well as daily and decorative pieces that were widely popular in Hong Kong.
EXPERTS have managed to recreate a historic porcelain last made 200 years ago.
IT IS WELL KNOWN THAT THE BULK OF popular chromolithographs of Hindu mythological characters were mass-produced in Germany in the 19th and early 20th centuries for export to India, but what is less known is the fact that a large number of their multi-chromatic porcelain avatars were also manufactured in Germany for the Indian market.
Armorial porcelain production has attained a record level among China's export porcelains and is a treasure in Sino--foreign cultural exchanges.
[4] Moreover, higher melting range reduces the risk of distortion and sagging of metal substructure during porcelain firing.
The "San Diego", a merchant galleon armed to fight the Dutch that sank after its first exchange of fire, yielded more than 500 blue and white porcelains, the majority of which came from Jingdezhen (National Museum of the Philippines 1993; Carre et al.
"There has been much renewed scholarship in identifying Caughley porcelains. The Caughley Society has also been set up for the pursuit of ceramic research for the benefit of scholars, collectors and enthusiasts worldwide," Jeremy added.
Traditional Chinese New Year celebrations will take place marking the influence the 1,500year-old Chinese porcelain industry has made on British ceramics.
Collectors such as Lorenzo the Magnificent preferred eastern ceramics--especially porcelains. This evolved in the later sixteenth century under Grand Duke Francesco I de' Medici in an attempt, unsuccessful but demonstrating great beauty, to establish the famed, but short-lived, Medici porcelain factory.
"The Chinese porcelains were items that were made for the Chinese community that was going to Indonesia to live," Brill explained.
Japan was manufacturing overglaze enamels on their porcelains, and by the 16th century, their highly prized Imari ware from Arita was mass-produced.
The most produced export designs of the 19th and early 20th centuries were the Canton famille rose porcelains, named after the port where the porcelain was decorated, now called Guangzhou.