population


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Related to population: population control

population

 [pop″u-la´shun]
1. the individuals collectively constituting a certain category or inhabiting a specified geographic area.
2. in genetics, a stable group of randomly interbreeding individuals.
3. in statistics, a theoretical concept used to describe an entire group or collection of units, finite or infinite; from it a sample can be drawn.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn),
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class. Compare: sample.
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population

(pŏp′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. All of the people inhabiting a specified area.
b. The total number of such people.
2. The total number of inhabitants constituting a particular race, class, or group in a specified area.
3. The act or process of furnishing with inhabitants.
4. Ecology All the organisms that constitute a specific group or occur in a specified habitat.
5. Statistics The set of individuals, items, or data from which a statistical sample is taken. Also called universe.

population

[pop′yəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, populus, the people
1 an interbreeding group of individuals characterized by genetic continuity through several generations.
2 a group of individuals collectively occupying a particular geographic locale.
3 any group that is distinguished by a particular trait or situation.
4 any group from which samples may be measured for some variable characteristic for statistical purposes.

population

EBM
A collection of subjects from which a sample is drawn for a study to obtain estimates for values that would be obtained if the entire population was studied.

population

Clinical research Universe A group of persons to be described or about which one wishes to generalize, assuming that the group is representative of an entire population. See Control population, Patient population Global village The aggregate of persons in a specified area. See Zero population growth.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class.
Compare: sample (1)
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population

  1. the total number of the individuals of a particular species, race or form of animal or plant, inhabiting a particular locality or region.
  2. (in genetics) the total number of BREEDING INDIVIDUALS of a species in a particular location.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a class.
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population,

n the instances about which a statement is made; all events, organisms, and items of a stated kind occurring or in existence in a specified time. In statistics, a hypothetic infinite supply or universe of events or objects like those being studied and from which a sample was drawn.
Enlarge picture
Pontic.
population, at-risk,
n the individuals belonging to a certain group or community who have the potential to contract a medical condition.

population

all of the animals in a specifically defined area considered as a whole. The population may also be defined in modes other than geography, e.g. the cow population, a species specification, the nocturnal bird population.

binomial population
see binomial population.
population cartogram
a map of populations.
case population
see case population.
closed population
e.g. closed herd or flock; a population into which no introductions are permitted, including artificial insemination or embryo transfer; the population is genetically and/or hygienically isolated.
comparison population
see comparison population.
contiguous p's
the populations are separated but have a common border. Some diseases are very difficult to restrain from spreading from one population to the next.
control population
see control population.
population density
see population density.
experimental population
the population in which the experiment, or trial, is being conducted.
finite population
one capable of total examination by census.
genetic population
see deme.
genetically defined population
one in which the ancestry of the animals in it is known.
population genetics
deals with the frequency of occurrence of inherited characteristics in a population.
infinite population
cannot be examined as a total population because they may never actually exist but are capable of statistical importance.
population limitation
restricting the growth of an animal population by desexing, by culling or by managemental means of interfering with reproduction.
population mean
the mean of the population.
population numbers
see population size (below).
open population
one in which immigration in and out is unrestrained.
parent population
the original population about which it is hoped to make some inferences by examination of a sample of its constituent members.
population proportion
the percentage of the population that has the subject characteristics.
population pyramid
a graphic presentation of the composition of a population with the largest group forming the baseline, the smallest at the apex.
population at risk
see risk population (below).
risk population
the population which is composed of animals that are exposed to the pathogenic agent under discussion and are inherently susceptible to it. Called also population at risk. High or special risk groups are those which have had more than average exposure to the pathogenic agent.
population size
actual counting of a total population, the census method, is not often possible in large animal populations. Alternatives are by various sampling techniques including area trapping, the trapping of all animals in an area, the capture-release-recapture method, the nearest neighbor and line transect methods,
The population size is expressed as the population present at a particular instant. Alternatively it can be expressed as an animal-duration expression when the population is a shifting one and it is desired to express the population size over a period (e.g. cow-day).
stable population
a population which has constant mortality and fertility rates, and no migration, therefore a fixed age distribution and constant growth rate.
target population
in epidemiological terms the population from which an experimenter wishes to draw an unbiased sample and make inferences about it.
References in classic literature ?
The bourgeoisie keeps more and more doing away with the scattered state of the population, of the means of production, and of property.
But British India, properly so called, only embraces seven hundred thousand square miles, and a population of from one hundred to one hundred and ten millions of inhabitants.
The difficulty of increasing population had been met, I guessed, and population had ceased to increase.
Within the spacious quadrangle, the whole population of the valley seemed to be assembled, and the sight presented was truly remarkable.
All these circumstances combined to produce a population at St.
There we have two specimens of these Neapolitans--two of the silliest possible frauds, which half the population religiously and faithfully believed, and the other half either believed also or else said nothing about, and thus lent themselves to the support of the imposture.
But the wise know that foolish legislation is a rope of sand which perishes in the twisting; that the State must follow and not lead the character and progress of the citizen; the strongest usurper is quickly got rid of; and they only who build on Ideas, build for eternity; and that the form of government which prevails is the expression of what cultivation exists in the population which permits it.
By this time the whole population had emerged from their hiding-places stealthily, thrusting their heads out first.
In one quarter, palaces of marble, laced and, crowned with light and flame and flowers, towered up into her marvellous twilights beautiful, beyond description; in another, a black and sinister polyglot population sweltered in indescribable congestion in warrens, and excavations beyond the power and knowledge of government.
One-third of the population of the South is of the Negro race.
It is obvious that there would have been even less reason to expect a disturbance among the people if after the battle of Borodino, when the surrender of Moscow became certain or at least probable, Rostopchin instead of exciting the people by distributing arms and broadsheets had taken steps to remove all the holy relics, the gunpowder, munitions, and money, and had told the population plainly that the town would be abandoned.
In this land where the population was centred in the towns it was possible to lose sight of civilisation in a very short time, passing only an occasional farmhouse, where the women were handling red roots in the courtyard; or a little boy lying on his elbows on the hillside surrounded by a flock of black strong-smelling goats.

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