syndesis

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Related to polysyndeton: polyptoton, epistrophe

syndesis

 [sin´dĕ-sis]

ar·thro·de·sis

(ahr-thrō'dē-sis)
The stiffening of a joint by operative means.
Synonym(s): artificial ankylosis, syndesis.
[arthro- + G. desis, a binding together]
References in periodicals archive ?
Doody interprets the polysyndeton of the passage this way: "To the arrival scene in Pamplona, however, these same and's are spoken in a more active voice that imparts a rush of enthusiasm to Jake's happy first impressions" (105).
Even the manner of expression parallels the spider image: the "very prosaic line" (Fordyce) haec atque ilia dies atque alia atque alia (152) recalls the metrically infelicitous line 48 and playfully suggests that Allius' name will be repeated over and over each day.(33) Moreover, the copia that characterizes this line continues to the end of the poem as Catullus makes a series of wishes marked by polysyndeton and an abundance of relative clauses:
In lyric, relatively short, simple, paratactic sentence structures, linked in parallel with one another by polysyndeton or asyndeton and a use of conjunctions denoting similarity or spatiotemporal continguity, tend to be preferred over long, complicated, hypotactic sentences and conjunctions denoting precise logical relations; and, more broadly, exemplification tends to be privileged over entailment, similarity over consequence, induction over syllogism.
In listing the natural victims of Orlando's rage, Ariosto's use of polysyndeton ("rami e ceppi e tronchi e sassi e zolle") takes us back to a prior instance of such cataloguing when Medoro pleads in his epithalamion that no shephered do damage "all'erbe, all'ombre, all'antro, al rio, alle piante." This recall to the earlier stanza tells us that Orlando's first acts of madness take the form of a textual interpretation--they are the perverse reader's response to Medoro's poem.
Kennedy's grand style, however, more often favored polysyndeton, whereby repeated conjunctions between sentence items in series suggest epic scope of endeavors.
contains nine uses of the word "and" in various functions of "yoking": first in the polysyndeton characteristic of the novel, joining the three verbs relating to the horsemen, and then as a simple coordinating conjunction joining the horsemen's clause with that of the architect; then in the ellipsis of the twice implied preposition "in" (in his coat, hat, and expression) in a sort of prepositional zeugma ("yoking" in Greek) suggesting the wearing of an expression as similar to the wearing of a hat; (4) and finally in the dominant adjectival coupling that is perhaps the most insistent stylistic feature of the novel, here in particularly strained or perhaps paradoxical form: casual and bitterly disinterested, condemned and conscientious.
Parataxis, the pervasive passive voice, polysyndeton, underlie McGahern's music, apparently, and the ineffable poise which encodes experience both familiar and impossible to plumb must, after all, be an effect achieved through words and the placing of words.
POLYSYNDETON: a scheme of repetition involving the use of conjunctions (such as and or or) in a series of words, phrases, or clauses.
The point is well made as this type of repeated structure, along with the insistent dual strategies of polysyndeton and asyndeton (with a tendency towards parataxis), is a key element and consistent feature of Rodoreda's prose.
The polysyndeton (see below) and obsolete language ("mine eyes") in the passage are, for me, anyway, a more convincing demonstration of Poe's "biblical" language.
At most they serve to underline other stylistic devices, notably polysyndeton, and may perhaps be said to reinforce the characteristic immediacy, energy, and disruptiveness of Dante's language.
The comment that a passage 'cumulatively deploys polysyndeton' (p.