silicone

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silicone

 [sil´ĭ-kōn]
any of a large group of organic compounds comprising alternating silicon and oxygen atoms linked to organic radicals; uses have included wetting agents and surfactants, sealants, coolants, contact lenses, and surgical membranes and implants.
silicone oil any of various fluid silicone polymers; some are injected into the vitreous of the eye to serve as a vitreous substitute during or after certain ophthalmologic surgical procedures, such as to prevent the reoccurrence of retinal detachment.

sil·i·cone

(sil'i-kōn),
A polymer of organic silicon oxides, which may be a liquid, gel, or solid, depending on the extent of polymerization; formerly widely used in surgical implants, in intracorporeal tubes to conduct fluids, as dental impression material, as a grease or sealing substance, as a coating on the inside of glass vessels for blood collection, and in various ophthalmologic procedures.

silicone

(sĭl′ĭ-kōn′)
n.
Any of a large group of oligomers and polymers based on the structural unit R2SiO, where R is an organic group, characterized by wide-range thermal stability, high lubricity, extreme water repellence, and physiological inertness and used in adhesives, lubricants, protective coatings, paints, electrical insulation, synthetic rubber, and prosthetic replacements for body parts.

silicone

A family of inert, synthetic polymers composed of a repeating unit -R2Si-O-, in which -R is a simple alkyl group (a hydrocarbon). Silicones can be produced in various forms (e.g., adhesives, sponges, solid blocks and gels) and are widely used in medicine, given their stability, water repellency and inert nature.

One formerly popular silicone, polydimethylsiloxane, was enclosed in plastic bags of various sizes and shapes for use in plastic surgery to impart cosmetically acceptable contours to soft tissues, most commonly used in women for breast augmentation and in men for chin augmentation. The complications of such implants in trained hands are minimal and are confined to rupture of the bags and/or fibrosis. Subcutaneous, often illicit, injection of silicone for breast enlargement without the enclosing bag (as may be self-administered by transsexual males) may be associated with high fever, diffuse arthritis, renal failure, dry cough, haemoptysis, diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates with patchy, ill-defined airspace consolidation, acute pneumonitis, hypoxemia, alveolitis (alveolar macrophages with silicone inclusions, neutrophils and eosinophils), decreased pulmonary function and granuloma formation.

silicone

A polymer composed of a repeating unit –R2Si–O– in which –R is a simple alkyl group–a hydrocarbon; silicones are produced in various forms–eg, adhesives, sponges, solid blocks, gels, and widely used in medicine, as they are stable, repel water and inert Medical devices Silicone is used for hydrocephalic shunts, pacemakers, implantable drug-delivery pumps, dialysis and chemotherapy ports, ostomy systems, tracheal and feeding tubes, central venous catheters, myringotomy tubes, cochlear implants, intraocular lenses, intra-aortic balloons, angioplasty devices, cardiac valves, vascular ports, various types of sheeting, and small-joint orthopedic devices 3 forms of silicone are used to fabricate implants: polymer–relatively hard; significant 'bleeding' is rare; elastomer–pliable; some silicone 'bleeding' occurs; gel–'bleeding' is common Plastic surgery Various formulations of silicone have been used in cosmetic surgery; one formerly popular silicone, polydimethylsiloxane, was enclosed in plastic bags of various sizes and shapes and implanted subcutaneously to impart cosmetically acceptable contours to soft tissues, most commonly in ♀ for breast augmentation, and in ♂ for chin augmentation; the complications of such implants in trained hands are minimal and confined to rupture of bags and/or fibrosis. See Breast implants, Human adjuvant disease, Mammoplasty.

sil·i·cone

(sil'i-kōn)
A polymer of organic silicon oxides, which may be a liquid, gel, or solid, depending on the extent of polymerization; used in surgical implants, in intracorporeal tubes to conduct fluids, as dental impression material, as a grease or sealing substance, as a coating on the inside of glass vessels for blood collection, and in various ophthalmologic procedures.

silicone

Any polymeric (long-chain), organic compounds of silicon and oxygen in which each silicon atom is linked to an alkyl group. Silicones may be produced as oils, greases or rubbers. Silicone rubber (Silastic) is a valuable prosthetic surgical structural material as it is inert and permeable to oxygen and well tolerated by the tissues.

sil·i·cone

(sil'i-kōn)
Polymer of organic silicon oxides, which may be a liquid, gel, or solid, depending on extent of polymerization; used in surgical implants, in intracorporeal tubes to conduct fluids, as dental impression material, as a grease or sealing substance, as a coating on inside of glass vessels for blood collection, and in various ophthalmologic procedures.

Patient discussion about silicone

Q. Do any of you with FM have silicone breast implants, or have you ever had them? How about saline? My silicone implants expired on the surgeon's shelf before they went in my body. Both implants ruptured and disintegrated within 5 years of implantation. I was diagnosed with FM shortly after 2 surgeries to remove silicone goo. Just wondering if anyone else has made the connection. Thank you!

A. As far as I know several studies failed to prove there is a connection between rupture of breast implants and fibromyalgia, as did the FDA conclude. Indeed I heard about one study that found this connection, but it seemed like a very problematic one.

You can read about this subject here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breast_implants#Claims_of_systemic_illness_and_disease)

More discussions about silicone
References in periodicals archive ?
Vinyl polysiloxane impression material because of their excellent attributes has displayed greater acceptability amongst the users and can be handled without much hassle.
The polysiloxane oligomer was synthesized according to a previously reported method.
A series of seven defoamers, based on polysiloxane chemistry, was developed to consistently and reproducibly match the requirements of a wide range of applications.
Polysiloxane/CNT nanocomposites were prepared by introducing CNTs into a polysiloxane prepolymer mixture.
For this purpose, selected polysiloxane resins are suitable as matrix precursors (Cerny et al., 2005).
It uses MX two-platen machines from Krauss-Maffei; a brand-new 2970-ton IMPmore system from Battenfeld; resins from Bayer, GE, and Teijin of Japan; and its own polysiloxane wet-coating technology.
The incident report states, 'Heat transfer fluids, such as Syltherm (a dimethyl polysiloxane), can present hazards when their vapours can form flammable atmospheres and come in contact with an ignition source.
Ameron won the award for its record as an innovator and leading supplier of polysiloxane (PSX) technology.
This is a vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material that can be used in place of traditional alginate for preliminary impressions and study models.