polyneuritis


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Related to polyneuritis: polyneuritis cranialis

polyneuritis

 [pol″e-noo͡-ri´tis]
inflammation of many nerves simultaneously.
acute febrile polyneuritis (acute idiopathic polyneuritis) (acute infectious polyneuritis) (acute postinfectious polyneuritis) Guillain-Barré syndrome.

pol·y·neu·rop·a·thy

(pol'ē-nū-rop'ă-thē),
1. A disease process involving a number of peripheral nerves (literal sense).
2. A nontraumatic generalized disorder of peripheral nerves, affecting the distal fibers most severely, with proximal shading (for example, the feet are affected sooner or more severely than the hands), and typically symmetrically; most often affects motor and sensory fibers almost equally, but can involve either one, either solely or very disproportionately; classified as axon degenerating (axonal), or demyelinating; many causes, particularly metabolic and toxic; familial or sporadic. Synonym(s): polyneuritis
[poly- + G. neuron, nerve, + pathos, disease]

polyneuritis

(pŏl′ē-no͝o-rī′tĭs, -nyo͝o-)
n.
Inflammation of several nerves at one time, marked by paralysis, pain, and muscle wasting. Also called multiple neuritis.

pol′y·neu·rit′ic (-rĭt′ĭk) adj.

pol·y·neu·rop·a·thy

(pol'ē-nūr-op'ă-thē)
1. A disease process involving a number of peripheral nerves (literal sense).
2. A nontraumatic generalized disorder of peripheral nerves, affecting the distal fibers most severely, with proximal shading (e.g., the feet are affected sooner or more severely than the hands), and typically symmetrically; most often affects motor and sensory fibers almost equally, but can involve either one solely or very disproportionately; classified as axon degenerating (axonal) or demyelinating; many causes, particularly metabolic and toxic; familial or sporadic in nature.
Synonym(s): polyneuritis.
3. Synonym(s): acrodynia (2) . Synonym(s): multiple neuritis.
[poly- + G. neuron, nerve, + pathos, disease]

polyneuritis

Any inflammatory disorder affecting peripheral nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) Electromyography is an alternative tool to aid in the antemortem recognition of polyneuritis, often associated with Marek's disease.
The association between hyperthyroidism and acute flaccid areflexic neuropathy receives little credence in the following well-known clinical textbooks: Dyck and Thomas' Peripheral Neuropathy [7] comments on its uncertain association and the difficulty to distinguish it from acute idiopathic polyneuritis; Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice [8] refers to its association as fortuitous; and Williams's Textbook of Endocrinology [9] and Harrison's Internal Medicine [10] do not even mention the association.
Eyach virus is found in Europe and is a tick-borne disease causing encephalitis and polyneuritis.
In any case, Debord's taking of his own life to end the physical suffering caused by what he describes as "alcoholic polyneuritis"--while it may be read as the final chapter in a life of independence and self-will--should not be read as a literary event.
In fact, with the exception of the relative surge of new pathologies like polyneuritis and the slight increase of some morbidity indicators during the first years of the decade, all health indicators have remained the same or improved towards the end of the 1990s, including infant mortality rates, hospital and community services and life expectancy.
Guillain-Barre syndrome, also known as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, acute idiopathic polyneuritis, and Landry's ascending paralysis, is a rare neuromuscular disorder characterized by an acute, ascending neuropathy.
An occurrence of polyneuritis by n-hexane in the polyethylene laminating plants.
In 1897, he discovered that the disease known as polyneuritis in animals and beriberi in humans could be induced in chickens and pigeons by a diet restricted to polished rice.
The clinical course of this type of rabies is slower, and the differential diagnosis includes GuillainBarre syndrome, poliomyelitis, postvaccine neuroparalytic reactions, herpes simplex virus encephalitis, and acute immune-mediated polyneuritis.[32]
The chicken polyneuritis showed symptoms similar to beriberi, and Eijkman was busily studying the disease and checking on its contagiousness-when it suddenly disappeared and all the chickens got well.
Various aetiological hypotheses are notified which include infections (Mycosis, mycobacteria), trauma (Plants), vascular (dysplasia), neurological (Polyneuritis), and genetic (keratoderma) mechanisms.